Take advantage of your RV Pennsylvania!

Recreational Vehicles take camping to the next level, they’re loaded with amenities that make camping an incredible experience. Although some have more features than others.  Here are three easy ways to make sure you’re getting the most out of your Lerch RV when you’re on the road.

1.  You have a kitchen so cook a feast!

Go gourmet in your RV. When you have tons of cabinetry for storing ingredients, a spacious refrigerator, and 3-burner stove, you’re set to cook like a chef. Have hotdogs and burgers one night, but plan a night where you break out the spices, the premier cuts of meat, the vino, and a homemade dessert. There are tons of RV cooking resources that can help you find RV-friendly gourmet recipes.

2.  There’s tons of sleeping space, so bring your friends. You have room!

In an RV, there’s way more sleeping space than you might ever use. Some of our current inventory floor plans sleep up to twelve campers. Why waste the space, the more the merrier. Grab your friends (or your kids’ friends) and bring them along. Memories are made when you get big groups together. Why do you think so many families try to go camping together?

3.  Make the most of entertainment systems.

Whether your RV has flat screen TVs inside, outdoor TVs, or both, you get the best of both worlds. Roughing it, while being able to laugh along with your favorite movie or TV show. Don’t feel guilty using (and loving) your TVs. Invite the neighbors (campers in the spots nearby) over for movie night or put the game on the outside TV.

Have any gourmet RV recipes, stories of packed RVs, and favorite RV movies? Share with us in the comments. Especially if you love RVing as much as we do!

Safe Travels and Happy RVing!

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Pink is our favorite color…RV Winterizing

 

RV winterizing with RV antifreeze

Got to think pink!

It is that time of year once more. Time to prepare to winterize your beloved camper.

As much as we don’t like having to think about putting our RV away for the winter, it’s inevitable if you live in colder climates. That’s why we’re here with ways to properly prepare your RV for colder weather or storage, which is very important in most states and Canada. If an RV is not properly prepared for the winter months, it may cause water supply lines and the water heater to freeze. This article will give you some great tips on how to best winterize your RV.

First off, your RV should be winterized at the end of the camping season or when the RV will be exposed to temperatures that will fall at or below 32°F (0°C).

 Depending on the type of RV you own, there are two methods of winterizing. Also, as always, we ask that you read, understand the instructions before beginning and follow the instructions as you go. If you are not sure if you should be winterizing your coach yourself, please visit your local RV dealership for help.  Many dealerships, such as Lerch RV, will provide you with assistance or show you how to properly and safely winterize your camper yourself.  Here are the two ways to winterize your RV depending on the type you have.

Air pressure

This method will utilize an air hose to blow excess water from the water lines.

1. Make sure all holding tanks are empty and drain valves OPEN.

2. Run the water pump until it is dry, this will take approximately 15-20 seconds.

3. OPEN all faucets and drains, and the toilet.

4. Using an air hose and adapter (customer supplied), blow air through the city water connection. Any remaining water will blow out in five to ten minutes.

5. Pour one cup of non-toxic RV antifreeze into all drain P-traps.

Demand or power plumbing system (the most popular way to winterize your RV)

It may be easier to winterize the RV with another person to assist you.

1. Level the RV and drain the fresh water plumbing system.

2. Replace the water filter cartridge with the clear plastic bypass hose (if so equipped).

3. Make sure the water heater 12-volt and 120-volt interior control switches are OFF.

4. Turn the water heater bypass valves to the BYPASS position. Your RV valves may also be labeled  “Sanitize/Winterize Lines” position.

5. Make sure the “fresh tank drain” and “low point drains” are closed.  For most RVs, the low point drains must be closed for the antifreeze to siphon through the lines.

6. Insert the garden hose into a container of RV antifreeze solution (this quantity should be enough to winterize the RV); attach the other end to the City Water Fill.

7. Turn the water pump ON.

8. Open the hot water line on all the faucets (kitchen, lavatory, shower and outside shower) until RV antifreeze begins to flow continuously.

9. Close the faucet hot water lines and repeat with the cold water lines on all the faucets. Do not forget to run RV antifreeze through the toilet.

When you are done adding RV antifreeze

10. Remove the garden hose from the container of RV antifreeze.

11. To prevent staining, wipe the RV antifreeze out of the sinks, shower (or tub) and toilet using a soft, dry cloth.

As always, if you need assistance, please contact your local RV dealer.

WARNING…Please note that repairs due to freezing are not always covered under the terms of your manufacturer warranty.  When in doubt, please consult your warranty and/or the dealership that you purchased your RV. Also,automotive antifreeze (ethylene glycol) and windshield washer antifreeze (methanol) are poisonous. Never use these products in your fresh water system. These products are harmful and may be fatal if swallowed. Please use approved non toxic RV anti-freeze in your camper.

Safe Travels and Happy RVing!

 

Blue-Ox Motorcycle Carrier

"Keystone RV" "Lerch RV" RV "PA RV Dealer" camper camping campers "tag along" "tow behind" "bunk model" "bunk house camper" "RV lifestyle" glamping caravan "Go RVing" RVing "new camper sale" "camper dealer" "new camper" "RV dealer" "PA RV Dealership" towing "used campers" "weekend fun" "family fun" "recreational vehicle" recreation "summer fun" "keystone rv company" "glamping" "fith wheel" "5th wheel camper" "travel trailer" "Open Range RV"

The Over-Bilt Sport-Loader provides a simple and effective method of
hauling a motorcycle while also providing the ability to tow a trailer,
camper, or travel trailer. The motorcycle will ride approximately
one inch off the bed of the pickup, providing a stable base for the ride.

To load, attach the channel extensions to the rear of the loader and
secure with the pin. Run the cradle to the base of the Sport-Loader
and roll the front tire of the motorcycle into the cradle, tighten the
bracket against the tire and strap the motorcycle to the cradle for
further stability while loading. The rear tire of the motorcycle will
track in the channel as the motorcycle is pulled into the bed of the
pickup.

motorcycle hauler, blue ox, "Keystone RV" "Lerch RV" RV "PA RV Dealer" camper camping campers "tag along" "tow behind" "bunk model" "bunk house camper" "RV lifestyle" glamping caravan "Go RVing" RVing "new camper sale" "camper dealer" "new camper" "RV dealer" "PA RV Dealership" towing "used campers" "weekend fun" "family fun" "recreational vehicle" recreation "summer fun" "keystone rv company" "glamping" "fith wheel" "5th wheel camper" "travel trailer" "Open Range RV"

As the motorcycle is pulled up the channel, the unit pivots on a
tube attached between the tailgate mounting posts, lowering the
motorcycle to the bed of the pickup. When the motorcycle’s tire
reaches the front of the pickup box,the motorcycle is fully loaded
and ready to be strapped in for travel.The channel extensions are
secured in the bed of the pickup when not in use.

One person loading and unloading
Stable base for cycle (approximately .1” off the bed)
Removable ramp extensions store in pickup bed
Extension available for over-height pickups (SC9010)
Optional stand for changing oil or working on your bike (SC9012)
Additional Cargo Buckle (SC9011)
Cross tube required (see Blue Ox Application Guide)
No modifications to the pickup box or wiring required.

P/N:
SC3000, 8′ Long Box
SC3001, 6′ Short Box

***Pivot Tube Sold Separately***

For more information see: Blue Ox.com

Pennsylvania RV Owners Be Aware! Please USe Safe Towing Tips

Defensive driving skills and practice result in safe, enjoyable towing

Towing a trailer is certainly not difficult, but it does represent a step up in complexity from driving a solo vehicle, requiring new awareness of combined vehicle length, trailer width, braking distance, turning characteristics and several other vital factors that must be considered while towing a trailer. Most of us drive trucks, SUVs or passenger cars daily, and graduate to RVs only occasionally. Thus, it’s always necessary to make a mental transition and try to keep the size and handling characteristics of the larger rig in mind. Allowing solo-vehicle habits to take over may result in a tendency to make turns too tightly, run over curbs, hit stationary objects such as overhanging tree limbs or to follow too closely.

Eyes on the Road
The first towing precautions are those that precede towing — matching the tow vehicle and trailer correctly, adhering to weight limits and making sure hitch selection and adjustment are correct, as described elsewhere in this guide. And it’s also important to refresh defensive driving skills. From there, the real fun begins. The combined length of tow vehicle and trailer, as well as the combined weight, must be in the forefront of your mind, right from the start. Maintaining extended following distances is one of the most important towing-related driving habits that initially is difficult to adhere to because we tend to fall into our typical driving habits. Even though trailer brakes may be functional, braking distances almost always are extended.

It’s also important to make lane changes carefully and slowly, and to allow extended distances for passing. Good, solidly mounted extendable mirrors with large reflective areas — adjusted properly — are also essential. Speedy traffic seems more tolerant of slow 18-wheelers than of slow RVs, which makes courtesy an important safety factor for RV owners because an irate driver trying to pass can be a serious safety threat; courtesy is not only the consideration of others, it’s a safety issue. Frequent monitoring of rearview mirrors is necessary; when a vehicle is tailgating and trying to pass, we should help by driving slightly to the right to give the other driver a better view of the road ahead, even if a passing opportunity does not exist at the time. We should use turnouts whenever possible and avoid following another vehicle so closely that a vehicle overtaking from the rear cannot return to the proper lane.

Time for a Brake
While RV brakes are adequate for most situations, care is necessary to avoid overheating, which can lead to brake fade. If brake fade occurs, it will likely be on steep downgrades. If this happens, friction will raise the temperature of brake pads and linings to extremely high levels, resulting in temporary loss of braking. The cure is prevention — downshifting to a gear range that is low enough to retard speed sufficiently that brakes need not be used more than occasionally. This way, enough braking performance is reserved to make an emergency stop, should it become necessary.

When braking on a grade is necessary, apply the brakes intermittently, with moderate pressure, and release the pedal to allow the brakes to cool. The action of electric trailer brakes should be apparent to the driver, and sufficient enough to handle the trailer’s weight. The controller should be adjusted so that maximum braking action does not cause trailer-wheel lockup. Improper controller adjustment is a major cause of inadequate braking, so it’s wise to study the manufacturer’s instructions. Travel-trailer instability (fishtailing) should not occur in a well-balanced, well-hitched combination, but if it does, independent activation of trailer brakes usually will bring the trailer back into line.

Back-Up Plans
All trailers require more space for turns, and travel trailers follow the tow-vehicle track more closely than do fifth-wheels, which track farther to the inside of a turn. There is need for continual awareness, which should eventually become second-nature after a modest amount of on-the-road experience. Fifth-wheel trailers are different to back than conventional trailers, and require more practice for someone accustomed to backing a conventional trailer. A well-used technique involves placing one’s hand at the bottom of the steering wheel and moving it in the same direction the trailer is intended to go. It’s more effective with travel trailers than with fifth-wheels, which often require more turning of the steering wheel. Hand-held two-way radios can allow an assistant to more effectively relay backing instructions to the driver.

Before each trip, it’s essential to check the tires to assure that inflation pressures match those molded on tire side walls (cold), or that they are appropriate for your load (consult load/inflation tables). Also, be sure to inspect all vehicle fluids and make sure trailer-wheel lug nuts are tightened to factory specifications. Trailering is a great way to explore the new horizons and a great way to check out the wonderful camping destinations that are available to owners of recreational trailers. But always keep in mind that defensive driving will pay off in safe travel.

If you have any questions about safe towing practices, call your central Pennsylvania RV Dealer at 800-722-1236.  We will gladly answer any questions that you may have.

Safe Travels and Happy RVing!

Portions of this blog are a re-posting of an article from Trailer Life Magazine