A few tips to keep Ants from Invading your RV…

Ants marching toward Lerch RV, how to keep ants from invading your RV/Camper...

When you are RVing at a campground or boon docking in the wilderness, you are susceptible to all kinds of insects and animals.

Ants are one of the more aggravating creatures to invade a RV, fortunately they are easy to get rid of. RV Travel shares this advice for us.

We woke up in our RV one fine morning with an upset cat. A large, black, moving column of ants, working its way across the RV from a crack near the entry door, across the flooring, up the wall cabinet, and into the kitchen sink. Hundreds of the little buggers, all intent on carrying away whatever it is that struck their fancy.

ANTS ARE CLEVER CREATURES – they send out scouts who scurry about the territory, looking for suitable food and water sources. If one crawls up your RV tire, water hose or power cable and eventually finds something inside your rig, he or she leaves a little smell trail of pheromones. Your proboscis won’t pick up on it, but to the ants, it’s an irresistible essence that must be followed — by hundreds of the scout’s fellows.

For whatever reason, ants won’t cross a line of bleach-containing scouring powder. Maybe it kills the pheromone trail, maybe it burns their little feet, we don’t know.

In any event, get out the Comet and shake a good border around everything of your rig that touches the ground: Tires, landing gear, stabilizers, cords, and hoses. This is better than spraying insecticide on these utilities, because the powdered cleanser will simply shake off, not stick to your hands, nor cause grief for pets and kids.

Of course, if the rains fall you may need to renew your magic circle, but while the powder’s out, the ants are gone.

This is a pretty easy fix. I wish it was this easy to repel other bugs or animals like, say, bears!

No, bears are nothing to laugh at. Now you should be equipped with some ant knowledge and some “bear” knowledge.

What more do you need? A new RV you say? We can equip you with that too!

More RV and Camping Safety Tips

You may read about RV and camper safety a lot when you’re surfing the internet or picking up the latest Trailer Life magazine. Personally I think you can never learn too much or think too often when it comes to RV safety. And as with anything else in life, practice what you read and preach.  To many times safety is placed on the back burner of our thought process when it comes to hitching up the wagon and hitting the road.  Many of my previous posts have been about RV and camping safety.  I can not stress how import this subject matter is.  So once again here are some more RV safety tips to think about….

"Keystone RV" "Lerch RV" RV "PA RV Dealer" camper camping campers "tag along" "tow behind" "bunk model" "bunk house camper" "RV lifestyle" glamping caravan "Go RVing" RVing "new camper sale" "camper dealer" "new camper" "RV dealer" "PA RV Dealership" towing "used campers" "weekend fun" "family fun" "recreational vehicle" recreation "summer fun" "keystone rv company"Propane:

Never paint the tank a dark color. It can absorb the sun’s rays and can cause it to overheat and explode.

  • Don’t travel with the stove, oven or heater burners lit.
  • Never refuel while any propane appliance or engine is running.
  • If you have an older propane tank, make sure it has an overfill protection device.
  • Install a propane gas detector.

Create a step-by-step checklist!!

Before you drive:

  • Make sure bay doors are closed and latched.
  • Double-check tow bar and safety cables.
  • Disconnect all power, TV, phone, water and sewer lines.
  • Retract jacks, steps, and awnings.
  • Look under the rig for signs of fluid leaks.
  • Check oil, transmission and coolant levels.
  • Check air brakes, parking brake and tow brakes.
  • Inspect tire inflation pressure and tread wear.
  • Make sure smoke and propane leak detectors are working.

Practice S.A.F.E Cornering:

RVers must compensate for the extra weight, height and length of their vehicles when cornering. Practice S.A.F.E. cornering:

  • Slowly approach the turn. It’s much easier to speed up in the corner than have to brake.
  • Arc the turn, careful to not arc the first swing in the opposite direction, confusing drivers behind as to where you really intend to go.
  • Finish the turn completely. Drivers make a common mistake when they straighten before the back-end of the vehicle has cleared the pivot point.
  • Experience is key. The best way to become a good RV driver is practice, practice, practice.[GMAC Insurance]

There are some good tidbits that I think you can print out and keep in your RV to refer back to every once in a while. That is if you like. I truly hope you have enjoyed some of these safety tips! That way next time you hit the road you will know that you and your family are good to go!

Have a great weekend adventure, run by on your way back so we can hear all about it.  And, if there is anything we can do to help, let us know!!

Safe Travels and Happy RVing!