Fiberglass Propane Cyclinders for RVing?

Fiberglass propane cylinders lighter, more durable…

If you ever thought that in the world of propane cylinders, “There’s nothing new under the sun,” think again. How about an LP cylinder made, not from steel or aluminum, but from plastic and fiberglass? Sound a bit wild? Hang on, there’s a company that sells them, and you might just want to consider them.

The Lite Cylinder Company is happily turning out fiberglass/plastic composite LP gas cylinders, and yes, first off, they are government DOT approved for use on RVs. What makes these little tanks different from their typical steel cousins?

First, they’re a wee bit lighter–about 30% lighter than conventional steel cylinders. This translates into about four pounds lighter for a standard 20-pound (five gallon) cylinder. The next size up? Lite Cylinder offers a 25-pound (six-gallon plus) cylinder that scales in at just about 19 pounds. While it holds a gallon less than the steel standard, it does weigh six-pounds less.

But the weight of these LP containments isn’t the only consideration. The actual gas containment vessel is made of spun fiberglass and plastic. The resulting vessel is translucent–you’ll never need to guess how much (or better still–how little) fuel is left in the cylinder–you can see the level with you own eyes. The actual “tank” if you will, is contained in a strong plastic shell that provides a carrying handle, a flat base to sit on, and stackability–you can toss these guys one on top of another.

The materials used in construction of Lite’s cylinders are also completely impervious to rust. No more “painting” your tanks; they won’t scratch and look ugly.

Ah, but what about price? The 20-pound cylinders retail on Lite’s website for $99, while the largest vertical cylinder, the 25-pounder, retails for $120.00. That’s a bit higher than your average camping store $99 retail price for a 30-pounder, but take into consideration you don’t need any “accessories” like a gauge system to determine how much LP is left, and no $11.00 “tank foot” to keep your cylinder from falling over while transporting.

The government gives a 15-year life estimate to these fiberglass cylinders. They are subject to the usual fire code regulations for periodic recertification. Get more information, locate a dealer, or order directly at the Lite Cylinder web site.

Article Courtesy of RV TECH Tips.
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More RV and Camping Safety Tips

You may read about RV and camper safety a lot when you’re surfing the internet or picking up the latest Trailer Life magazine. Personally I think you can never learn too much or think too often when it comes to RV safety. And as with anything else in life, practice what you read and preach.  To many times safety is placed on the back burner of our thought process when it comes to hitching up the wagon and hitting the road.  Many of my previous posts have been about RV and camping safety.  I can not stress how import this subject matter is.  So once again here are some more RV safety tips to think about….

"Keystone RV" "Lerch RV" RV "PA RV Dealer" camper camping campers "tag along" "tow behind" "bunk model" "bunk house camper" "RV lifestyle" glamping caravan "Go RVing" RVing "new camper sale" "camper dealer" "new camper" "RV dealer" "PA RV Dealership" towing "used campers" "weekend fun" "family fun" "recreational vehicle" recreation "summer fun" "keystone rv company"Propane:

Never paint the tank a dark color. It can absorb the sun’s rays and can cause it to overheat and explode.

  • Don’t travel with the stove, oven or heater burners lit.
  • Never refuel while any propane appliance or engine is running.
  • If you have an older propane tank, make sure it has an overfill protection device.
  • Install a propane gas detector.

Create a step-by-step checklist!!

Before you drive:

  • Make sure bay doors are closed and latched.
  • Double-check tow bar and safety cables.
  • Disconnect all power, TV, phone, water and sewer lines.
  • Retract jacks, steps, and awnings.
  • Look under the rig for signs of fluid leaks.
  • Check oil, transmission and coolant levels.
  • Check air brakes, parking brake and tow brakes.
  • Inspect tire inflation pressure and tread wear.
  • Make sure smoke and propane leak detectors are working.

Practice S.A.F.E Cornering:

RVers must compensate for the extra weight, height and length of their vehicles when cornering. Practice S.A.F.E. cornering:

  • Slowly approach the turn. It’s much easier to speed up in the corner than have to brake.
  • Arc the turn, careful to not arc the first swing in the opposite direction, confusing drivers behind as to where you really intend to go.
  • Finish the turn completely. Drivers make a common mistake when they straighten before the back-end of the vehicle has cleared the pivot point.
  • Experience is key. The best way to become a good RV driver is practice, practice, practice.[GMAC Insurance]

There are some good tidbits that I think you can print out and keep in your RV to refer back to every once in a while. That is if you like. I truly hope you have enjoyed some of these safety tips! That way next time you hit the road you will know that you and your family are good to go!

Have a great weekend adventure, run by on your way back so we can hear all about it.  And, if there is anything we can do to help, let us know!!

Safe Travels and Happy RVing!