Camping is for the dogs too!

Camping is for the dogs too!

Camping is for the dogs too!

Pennsylvania camping is for the dogs (and other pets too.)

No one understands family like Lerch RV. That’s why when we say “family”, our four-legged, furry friends are always included.  Camping is a great way to bring families closer and often that includes pets. That is why your central Pennsylvania RV dealership is pet friendly. You can always find a few four-legged friends inside our dealership.  Customer are always welcome to bring their pets inside with them. We are dog friendly as long as your dog is friendly as well.

Pet Friendly Campgrounds:

No need to leave any family members behind when you head out for a family camping trip.  We’ve found a great resource for finding pet friendly campgrounds! There are many internet sites out there that will help you find a campground that both you and Fido will enjoy. Many more campgrounds, private and state funded are becoming pet friendly.

Camping Etiquette:

Pet friendly camping is the perfect way to include all family members in your vacation, but don’t forget, that does mean a little more work for you and your family.  Here are a 4 rules to remember when you RV with Spot:

  1. Pick it up: Always clean up after your dog (or other pets) after they’ve finished going to the bathroom.  No one wants to be out for a hike and step in Fido’s leave behinds.  Bring plenty of environmentally friendly pick up bags with you and dispose of them in dedicated receptacles.
  2. Know your limits: Your dog might be the friendliest dog you’ve ever met, but that doesn’t mean everyone’s dog is on the same page.  When leaving your campsite to roam the grounds, bring along a leash for those less than friendly encounters.
  3. No man (or pet) left behind: Remember the tent or RV you’re staying in might not feel like home to your family pet.  Try to minimize leaving your pet alone to reduce the amount of stress your pet experiences.  No one wants to be left out of all the fun!
  4. Watch the weather: Just like us humans, pets are sensitive to extreme hot and cold. On hot days, bring water and find rivers/lakes to help pets cool down. On cold days, think about leaving Fido in the RV or bringing along an adorable puppy jacket.
  5. Be courteous:Just be courteous of your neighbors and surroundings. Not everyone is a pet lover. So use a common sense approach when camping with your pets.

Have any other pet tips to share? We’d love to add them to our list. We love to hear from you…

Boomers rolling into Retirement in RVs

Baby Boomers love RVing!

Baby boomers have long been recognized as a generation on the move and many of them have plans to pick up the pace even more in retirement.

They’re flying overseas for exotic African safaris, European river cruises and walks atop the Great Wall of China.

But they’re also staying closer to home, getting an up-close-and-personal view of the nation they grew up in, perhaps along two-lane roads, stopping for the night at some secluded campground. For those trips, many will use recreational vehicles.

RV sales have spiked in recent years due to several factors, including an improving economy and more boomers retiring.

“RV sales will benefit as aging baby boomers continue to enter the age range in which RV ownership is highest,” noted the authors of a 2012 report from the Recreation Vehicle Industry Association.

Boomers are drawn to RVs because they have, in general, always been drawn to travel.

Baby boomers, in fact, are America’s most traveled generation, even to this day, according to the AARP Public Policy Institute.

“When they were younger, baby boomers traveled more than older people, and now that they are older, they travel more than younger people,” according to a recent report from the institute.

The increase in interest by baby boomers has certainly been good news for RV dealers and manufacturers, but destinations, too, are adjusting to the influx of boomers.

RV travel is still camping, but many baby boomers are now accustomed to traveling in style so campgrounds are modifying their offerings as a result.

Many RV resorts have in recent years added wellness centers and exercise classes — two trends that have long been popular with baby boomers. Others offer concierge service, elegant dining halls and lighted tennis courts.

Some resorts have added live shows and musical acts to draw in boomers.

The Rocky Fork Ranch Resort in Eastern Ohio offers an indoor pool, fitness center and sauna.

Baby boomers also enjoy their technology so many campgrounds now offer cable TV and free Wi-Fi. It’s not exactly roughing it, but it’s certainly something many boomers don’t want to surrender while away from home.

“The baby boomers have arrived … and RV parks and resorts are responding by providing a greater variety of activities and entertainment,” Paul Bambei, president and CEO of the National Association of RV Parks and Campgrounds recently told RV Business magazine.

The RVs themselves these days also allow for luxurious travel. The big ones can be 40 feet long and cost $200,000 or more.

Some have maple cabinetry, satellite-fed LCD TVs, washer and dryers and even fireplaces. All in all, “camping” isn’t what it used to be and boomers are enjoying the change.

information written by RICK ADAMCZAK, The Daily Reporter

RV Lifestyle: Tips for beginners and vets

There’s never been a better time to take up the RV lifestyle.

Whether you’re a weekend wanderer, a snow bird or an RV full-timer, there’s an RV to suit any travel budget and taste.

With baby boomers reaching retirement age, more and more people are taking to the road with their motor homes, RVs or travel trailers. The Recreation Vehicle Industry Association recently reported that nearly 8 million American households have an RV, motor home or travel trailer and that there are as many as 30 million RV enthusiasts in the U.S.

Seeing the country in an RV offers many benefits for travelers seeking an affordable and exciting way to spend quality family time. According to one study, a family of four can save up to 74% traveling by RV over more conventional travel. And with more than 16,000 public and privately owned campgrounds in the US, there’s a site to fulfill everyone’s vacation fantasy, whether it’s an oceanfront view, hiking trails, casino gambling or tennis.

6 Tips for Successful RV Travel
RV travel is easy to learn, and once you’ve got the hang of it there’ll be no going back! Here are six helpful tips that will come in handy for both beginning and seasoned RV enthusiasts:

    1. Map Your RV Travel Destinations
      A large part of the RV appeal is the exhilarating freedom of the open road — to go wherever you want, whenever you want. But it helps to have a solid travel plan in place. If you know where you’re heading, you can determine the route that will offer the most interesting sights.Look in RV and other travel guides, contact tourism boards in states you’ll be passing through, and search the Internet.Make sure to bring the correct road maps, and a GPS system is a good idea as well, especially if you’re new to RV travel.

      Carefully designing the route you’ll be taking will make it easier to do spur-of-the moment things like checking out that oddball museum you just spotted on a roadside billboard!

    2. Have A Checklist? Just Checking
      During your pre-trip prep, in addition to working out what needs to be in the RV, put together a thorough checklist of things to do when setting up at an RV campground.There are the basics:

      • Locate all campground connections
      • Make sure your RV is level
      • Properly hook up your water, gas and electric systems

      Don’t forget comfort concerns, like making sure you packed your favorite CDs and DVDs, and those new lawn chairs.

      Equally important, you should have a second checklist of things that have to be done to break camp and set up your RV for departure (Quick hint: when you think the job is done and everything is ready, check again).

    3. Be Prepared with a “Just-For-The-RV” First-Aid Kit
      Always make sure you have a fully stocked RV first-aid kit, and keep it in an outside storage compartment.Your RV first-aid kit should include basic medical supplies:

      • Bandages
      • Ointment
      • Over-the-counter pain reliever
      • Insect repellant
      • Scissors
      • An emergency supply of must-have medications

      Plus the following extras for your RV:

      • Flashlight and extra batteries
      • Paper and pens
      • A disposable camera in case you have to take photos of an accident site.
      • Cell phone and charger

      If you don’t feel up to the task of putting together an RV first-aid kit yourself, an extensive range of ready-made first-aid kits is available for purchase.

      Don’t forget to include a list of important contact information, including family members, doctors, insurance agents, etc. [Editor’s note: Leave a copy of your itinerary and your contact information with a family member or friend, in case you need to be located in an emergency.]

       

    4. RV Camping with Kids and Pets
      If your RV travel includes children, make sure to set aside time during the day for outdoor activities, as even the roomiest RV can be confining for kids.And give each child his or her own space in the RV (no matter how small) for toys, games and personal stuff.RV travel is a unique opportunity for your children to see new and different places and faces. There are often plenty of other kids at campgrounds – but be sure to walk around a new campground with your children when you first get settled there. They need to know how to find your campsite and navigate the RV grounds. If you plan to bring the family pet, check beforehand to confirm that pets are allowed at the RV campground.
  1. A Little Help From Your Friends
    When in doubt, ask your fellow RVer. However well-traveled you might be, odds are there is someone you’ll meet along the way who has been somewhere you haven’t, solved a problem you haven’t yet encountered, or spotted an out-of-the-way delight you’ve never heard of.No matter how much research you’ve done, there’s bound to be an RV campsite you haven’t read about, a storage system that has escaped your notice, or a funny anecdote that you’ll laugh about for years to come.The new folks you meet may or may not become close friends for life, but they are an important part of your RV journey.
article written by John Noble from about.com

Fall camping in Pennsylvania is great!

Summer and the family camping season has come to a close. Don’t give up on the idea of a fall camping trip. Before putting away your camping gear until next summer, think about another camping trip. Those of us without kids are free to camp during the week, but families shouldn’t miss the opportunity to do some quality camping with their kids on weekends at local parks and campgrounds.

For those of you who are not blessed with children, it’s a good time to start planning a fall camping trip to one of those previously over-crowded, summer destination hot spots. After Labor Day, the visitor traffic to the State Parks, National Parks and National Forests slows down considerably, due primarily to the fact that kids are back in school.  Days aren’t as hot, and nights are just cool enough to cuddle under a blanket for a good sleep. And another blessing to fall campers is the fact that parks are less congested. Autumn colors can be magnificent, and wildlife could be active, offering opportunities to glimpse them as they prepare for winter.

The cooler nights are perfect for sitting around the campfire eating S’mores and banana boats and sharing stories and songs with your family, long time friends, and new acquaintances. When the leaves start changing colors the experience is even more worthwhile. So grab a sweatshirt, your tent, and head on out there to enjoy one of the most favorite seasons of the year!

Fall camping considerations

  • After Labor Day, many campgrounds reduce their fees, so one fall camping advantage is reduced costs.
  • Although daytime temperatures in the fall are still warm, take some heavier clothes and bedding for those cooler evenings.
  • As the seasons change, so to do the weather patterns. Be prepared for severe weather in the fall. If you are camping in hurricane alley, know your evacuation routes. If you are camping in high country, take appropriate snow gear. And, if you are in monsoon country, take necessary rain gear.
  • Make campground reservations. Popular campgrounds will still fill up on weekends, so it’s better to be safe than sorry. Most campgrounds don’t require reservations in the fall, but even if you should call and find that you don’t need a reservation, you’ve at least saved yourself the worry.

 

 

Today’s Campgrounds meet social media demands…

I recently came across this article that I found quite interesting. So I wanted to share it with you.  It amazes me how we have to stay connected, and be able to have that instantaneous update or check in with the rest of the world.  I am guilty of this myself. What about you?

Safe travels and Happy RVing!

Campgrounds embrace technology to meet big social media demand

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (AP) — For the Wohlfords of Noblesville, the Old Mill Run Park in Thorntown is a home away from home. The couple recently graduated from being weekend campers to full timers, staying there all summer long.

But with that upgrade came another —the need to have wireless Internet.

“We would be OK for a weekend,” said Mary Ann, 64. “But when you are full-time, for us, it wouldn’t work. There are just so many things that are (done) through the computer, through the Internet.”

Her husband, Steve Wohlford, agreed. “We need to stay in touch and pay our bills,” said Steve, 66.

NO DISCONNECT

It used to be that campers would take their RVs or tents and head into the woods to be rid of the electrical devices that distract and occupy our daily lives. However, as technology has become more mobile, it has become increasingly difficult to disconnect, even in the woods. Today, more campers request that campsites offer WiFi so they can stay connected and campground owners have accommodated this request.

About 72 percent of privately owned and operated campgrounds, RV parks and RV resorts offer wireless Internet service, according to a 2010 campground operations survey by the National Association of RV Parks and Campgrounds.

Eric Stumberg, founder and chief executive officer of TengoInternet, an Austin, Texas-based company that specializes in providing wireless Internet service to private campgrounds, said the trend started to take off about five years ago. Similar to hotels, campgrounds needed to offer WiFi as an amenity.

For his company, the number of unique connections has increased 50 percent to 75 percent each year, he said. This has been driven by more people connecting and families using multiple devices to do so.

“It’s weird, you would think if you were going camping you wouldn’t need to be connected,” he said. “(But) people want to be connected while they are traveling. Ten or 15 years ago, when people traveled, it wasn’t important that they stayed connected.”

Sandy and Ralph Christman own the RV Park where the Wohlfords are staying. They added WiFi about five years ago because campers were requesting it, Sandy said.

Safe Pennsylvania RVing

Being in the thick of nature while RVing or camping, offers a wide array of benefits for the avid RVer. In addition to spending quality time with loved ones, being out in nature offers the chance to participate in activities in a less crowded area, or even offers the chance to do activities specific to nature. For example, snowboarding or skiing, atving, snowmobiling and hiking. However, being away from the crowded areas has its own set of cons. The biggest being the mere distance from medical care in the case of injury while RVing. Because of this, we’re filling you in on some basic injury prevention tips:

  1. Carry a first-aid kit and invest in basic first-aid training.
  2. Use the buddy system. If you plan on going for a long hike or ride, bring a friend!
  3. Carry a cell phone or two-way receiver whenever you’re away from your RV or campsite.
  4. If you are experiencing the ‘wilds’ on your own, let someone know where you will be and when they should expect you to return.
  5. Know your limits. While a healthy challenge can be a good thing, don’t get in over your head.
  6. Get familiar with the American Red Cross and Center for Disease Control websites. Both are great resources for preparedness.

We encourage you to have fun while RVing and camping, but always use common sense.

Safe Travels and Happy RVing!

A Few Good Tips for the Pennsylvania RV Newbie

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New to RVing? We can help. Everybody has to learn the ins and outs of RVing at some time. Hopefully, your mistakes and accidents will be minimal in the beginning.

I thought I would put together some things to think about as you prepare your new RV and yourself, to experience the RVing lifestyle like a pro!

  1. Take care of your black water tank. This is one of the most important things to learn about. If your RV doesn’t have a black water tank sprayer, dump plenty of water down the toilet to clean it out. Add recommended chemicals regularly to ensure that tank material biodegrades properly. Packets are the fastest and easiest to use and require the least storage space; just toss one down the toilet with a gallon of water. Use RV toilet paper; it biodegrades faster.
  2. Make a maintenance checklist. Make a checklist of things to do before and after each RV trip to ensure that you don’t forget any maintenance procedures while you’re learning. Make notes of anything that you need to keep an eye on so that you can check it consistently. You don’t want any surprises while you’re on the road.
  3. Keep fridge and pantry stocked. Keep non-perishable staples on-board all season so you’re ready for spur-of-the-moment getaways.  Make sure they are foods that will work together to make a meal.  Remember to use food before their expiration date.
  4. Keep clothing, gear on board. Keep a set of toiletries, toothbrushes, clothing, games, leisure gear, pet supplies, etc. on board so that you have minimal packing to do at vacation time.

This is just a very small list to get you started in your quest to become an experienced camper.  Did I miss anything you experienced RVers? Please share more tips in the comments below….

Safe Travels and Happy RVing!