Yummy Campfire Breakfast

Campfire Toad in a Hole

Campfire Toad in a Hole

Difficulty: Easy | Total Time: 1 hr | Makes: 4 servings

Preparing food on the campfire is all about making do with what’s in the camping kit, and all you need for this dish is a sturdy cast-iron pan. We took the elements of the classic British Toad in the Hole and made a one-pot sausage-and-pancake meal. This Americanized breakfast version starts with an easy batter of cornmeal, flour, milk, and eggs that you can make at home and throw into the cooler. When you’re ready for breakfast, heat up the cast-iron pan over the campfire and brown some breakfast sausages. Then pour in the batter, drizzle with maple syrup, and let the whole thing cook up into one big sweet-savory pancake. Slice into wedges, and a hearty meal is served.

Game plan: The batter can be made up to one (1) day ahead and stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator or in a cooler with ice. When you’re ready to use it, be sure to whisk the batter again to recombine everything.

INGREDIENTS
  • 1/2 cup fine-ground yellow cornmeal
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon granulated sugar
  • 3/4 teaspoon fine salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter (1/4 stick)
  • 14 uncooked breakfast sausage links (12 ounces)
  • 3 tablespoons maple syrup, plus more for serving
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Whisk the cornmeal, flour, sugar, salt, and baking powder together in a large bowl. Add the milk and eggs and whisk until just combined and no streaks of flour remain; set aside. (The batter can be made up to 1 day ahead and stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator or a cooler.)
  2. Heat a camping stove to medium (about 350°F to 450°F) or fit a campfire with a grilling grate.
  3. Place a large cast-iron skillet on the stove or grate and heat until a drop of water sizzles and immediately disappears on the surface, about 5 minutes.
  4. Add the butter and heat until foaming. Add the sausages and cook, turning occasionally, until browned all over and cooked through, about 12 to 15 minutes. Transfer the sausages to a large plate.
  5. Whisk the batter again to recombine, then pour it into the skillet in an even layer. Arrange the sausages on top of the batter in an even layer and drizzle the measured maple syrup over the surface of the batter and sausages. Cover tightly with aluminum foil and cook undisturbed until the batter is puffed, cooked through, and golden brown on the bottom, about 15 to 20 minutes.
  6. Cut into wedges and serve immediately, passing additional maple syrup on the side.

Enjoy!

Safe Travels and Happy RVing!

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Condensation in Pennsylvania RVs

Condensation in RVs is common and, over the years, I have had lots of questions regarding condensation,so we’re here to explain what it is and how to minimize it in your RV.

RV condensation, RV window condensation, how to prevent RV condensation

Condensation is defined in the Merriam-Webster online dictionary as: a chemical reaction involving union between molecules often with elimination of a simple molecule (as water) to form a new more complex compound of often greater molecular weight.

Condensation happens when the surface the condensation has gathered on is cooler than the temperature of the water vapor that created the condensation. Where there is a high level of humidity from normal day activities, such as cooking or showering, condensation will form when this humid air comes in contact with colder surfaces, which causes dampness on surfaces.

While most RV manufactures can’t guarantee an elimination of all condensation, I would like to provide you some tips to lessen the condensation that happens inside your RV. When you’re cooking or showering, be sure that you’re using the roof vent fans. The fan will pull the moisture out of the unit, reducing the chance for it to collect on the windows and the walls. Using an extra fan to help move the air around inside of the RV can also help. Another idea to reduce the chances for condensation to form is to use the microwave to heat up water, rather than the stove, to contain the moisture and limit the amount that is allowed into the air. If no microwave is available, opening a small window while heating water on the stove will allow the moisture to escape. In addition, using a small de-humidifier inside of your RV will help with removing the moisture from the air.

The more you allow the moisture building inside of your RV to escape and move the air around so it has less of a chance to settle, the less condensation you’ll find in your unit. If you use these tips and adapt them to other purposes, you’ll be able to reduce the amount of condensation that forms on your walls and windows inside your unit.

If you need additional roof vent fans installed or your existing ones fixed, please contact your central Pennsylvania RV dealer, Lerch RV at 800-722-1236. Our RV service department will gladly help you out.