NPS-Closed Campgrounds,Fewer Seasonal Employees,Sunday Closures

Sequestration hits National Park Service, RVers and campers.

Closed campgrounds, Sunday closures of National Park System units, and 900 permanent positions that will go unfilled are just some of the latest details of how the National Park Service is responding to the ongoing federal budget sequestration.

* At Wind Cave National Park in South Dakota, officials said the 64-site Elk Mountain Campground would remain closed. That move eliminates the need for two summer employees to maintain the campground and interpretive rangers to present evening campfire programs, park officials said.

“The sequestration has forced us to make some tough decisions that will impact visitors to Wind Cave National Park,” said Superintendent Vidal Davila. “People will have fewer opportunities to tour Wind Cave, the park’s primary resource, as a result of less staff.”

The 5 percent budget cut also will lead to a reduction in invasive plant control at the park, maintenance of fences and building repairs, science and research activities, natural resource monitoring, and wildlife management programs.

* In Alabama, Park Service officials said the sequestration forces them to close the Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site, Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site, and the Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail on Sundays until further notice.

* At Voyageurs National Park in Minnesota, the cuts could lead to delays in snow plowing this spring on the Rainy Lake Ice Road, the Kab-Ash Ice Road, and the entrance to the Rainy Lake Visitor Center as park officials look to reduce fuel consumption and overtime pay.

Park officials say that when snowfall occurs before or after regular park operating hours, snow removal will be delayed until personnel report for normal duty hours. If significant snowfall occurs during weekends the Rainy Lake Visitor Center may be closed.

* At Badlands National Park in South Dakota, the 5 percent budget cut equates to a 24 percent reduction in seasonal hires for positions that support interpretive talks and walks, school programs, custodial services, road, fence and building repair and maintenance, science and research activities, natural resource monitoring, and search and rescue operations.

“The seasonal workforce is the heart of the park,” said Superintendent Eric Brunnemann. “This sort of loss cuts deeply into our ability to serve the public, something we are dedicated to doing every day.”

* Across the entire park system, 900 permanent positions that currently are vacant will not be filled, Park Service Director Jon Jarvis said Friday in a memo to the entire agency.

“In an organization with 15,000 permanent employees, 900 vacant jobs have a profound effect. Every activity will be affected. Some impacts will be immediate, others will accumulate over time,” Director Jarvis said. “Fewer law enforcement rangers and USPP officers mean lower levels of protection and longer response times. Fewer maintenance personnel mean that parks may have to close facilities completely when breakdowns occur – and that the $12 billion maintenance backlog will continue to grow.”

The memo did not, however, mention how many vacant positions the Park Service has been carrying in recent months.

Director Jarvis said the agency, system-wide, would see seasonal hirings drop by more than 1,000 employees, would furlough some staff in the U.S. Park Police, and would ban all non-essential travel.

“‘Essential’ travel includes only the following: travel that is critical for health and safety, and travel to attend training required to retain current, mission critical certifications – such as contracting warrants. International travel is cancelled,” wrote the director.

Director Jarvis also noted that the most recent continuing resolution to fund the federal government expires March 27.

“We do not know how, or if, the debate on a new continuing resolution will impact the remainder of Fiscal Year 2013 or the Fiscal Year 2014 budget negotiations. For now, please assume that we will operate for the remainder of the year at the 95 percent spending level envisioned in your sequestration plans,” he wrote.

From nationalparkstravel.com by NPT staff.

2013 York PA RV Show – York Campers Show

Say YES to the RV!

The York RV Show is being held once again this year at the York Fairgrounds, York Pennsylvania.

March 8-10,2013

Show Hours:

  • Friday 11am – 9pm
  • Saturday 10am – 9pm
  • Sunday 11am – 5pm.

Lerch RV will once again have the largest display of RVs at the York Camper/RV Show for our customers to view. Stop by our display in the Memorial Hall-East building. Along with having the lowest sale prices at the show on great travel trailers and fifth wheels. We will also be giving away a new iPad, and over $1,000 in additional prizes.

Say Yes to the RV and purchase you new RV at the York RV Show and we will reimburse your entry fee when you accept delivery of your new travel trailer or fifth wheel.

Do not forget to pick up a copy of our annual EARLY BIRD SALE flyer. This is your last chance to take advantage of our available low winter discounts.

Say Yes to the RV!

And buy now, before our industry leading manufacturers; Keystone RV and Open Range RV, raise their prices. Do not allow these discounts to disappear…

Give our Sales Team a call at 800-722-1236.

PA RV Dealer-RV sale-RV Show-low prices

Lerch RV Early Bird Sale

Pennsylvania RV owners celebrate for FREE!

Free Lerch RV Gift Card
Lerch RV is giving away a FREE $36 gift card, good towards purchases made in our large parts store, service invoices or a new RV. In celebration of our Thirty-sixth year anniversary, we would like to offer our customers and friends this FREE $36 Lerch RV Gift Card. You can get yours by going HERE. Hurry, this offer is only available until January 31,2013.

And do not forget to check out our Thirty-sixth Anniversary Sales Flyer for the lowest prices on RVs by national leading manufacturers. Start the new year off right, with low, low, low RV prices from Pennsylvania’s largest travel trailer dealer.

Lerch RV's 36th Anniversary Sale

Adjustable RV Water Fill

10MT-RV-water-filling-unit

I stumbled upon this neat little trick from Trailer Life magazine.  I think it is a great little RVing trick.  Here in our large RV parts store, we sell a fresh water fill hose extension, however for those DIY out there, this idea would work well.

A standard freshwater tank filler, which is made of a water hose connector and plastic tubing, would not stay in the my camper’s fresh-water inlet because of the hose’s weight and water pressure while filling.

To solve this problem, I made a flexible filler unit out of ½-inch threaded PVC parts purchased from the plumbing department at my local home improvement store. Assemble as shown; do not tighten or seal the threaded parts, just make them snug. The threaded parts must be able to move to get the water hose to hang properly with little or no pressure on the freshwater tank filler. The assembly can also be flattened for easy storage.

Willard Dunlap, Albuquerque, N.M.

Do you have any ideas or modifications to share?

Outback Terrain RV: Coming soon to a PA dealer near you

The Outback Terrain RV:the newest ultra lite travel trailer in Keystone RV line up.

Introducing the newest ultra lite travel trailer, the Terrain 273TRL by Outback. Manufactured by the Keystone RV company. The Terrain travel trailer features innovative design and a camper packed with features. The Terrain by Outback takes comfort and style to a whole new level. Vaulted ceilings and upgraded furniture provide a roominess and sophistication unseen in other ultra light weight trailers.

Outback Terrain 273TRL a Keystone RV ultra lite travel trailer for sale in Pennsylvania at Lerch RV 800-722-1236

Terrain 273TRL by Outback

 

The Outback Terrain delivers the styling that campers have come to expect from Outback. See for yourself how the new Terrain 273TRL can make camping better than it has ever been.

For more information on the all new Terrain RV, please call 800-722-1236. Our dedicated RV sales team will gladly answer any questions. RV Financing is available for qualified buyers.

Every New Lerch RV sale includes:

  • Customer orientation / walk-through
  • Full Dealer Prep (PDI)
  • Full LP Bottles
  • Gift Card
  • New Auxiliary Battery
  • No hidden fees
  • PA state inspection
Outback Terrain 273 TRL Keystone RV for sale in Pennsylvania at Lerch RV 800-722-1236

The Terrain 273TRL by Outback

Outback Terrain 273TRL a Keystone RV ultra lite travel trailer for sale in Pennsylvania

The Terrain 273TRL by Outback

 

Cleaning your RV, the ‘inside’ scoop.

I have posted about keeping your RV clean before, but usually focus on the outside.  However if you are like me and like to keep a clean house inside, below are some tips for the interior of your travel trailer or fifth wheel.  Keeping your Recreational vehicle or camper clean will help extend the life of your unit, plus a regular cleaning will enable you to become familiar with areas of your RV, and acts a great preventative maintenance visual check. You could discover a small problem before it becomes a major one.

So here with some helpful hints on cleaning the inside of your RV. First, it’s important to use the proper cleaning supplies and techniques to avoid damages that may happen to the interior surfaces of your RV. It’s always important to check with your manufacturer’s information for the recommended cleaning agents.  Clean only as recommended. If you’re ever in doubt about a cleaning product and what it might do to your RV, be sure to first test a small area out of sight. And please, don’t ever use flammable liquids or sprays to clean your RV.

So, now that the basics are out-of-the-way, we’ll break it down into areas of your RV interior.

Furniture Upholstery: if your furniture is covered in fabric or suede and it becomes stained or dirty, it is recommended that the fabric be professionally cleaned. You can refer to the specific manufacturer’s instructions for more care options.  For all vinyl covered furniture, water based cleaners are recommended, but not solvents as they may have an adverse reaction. Blot up the spot rather than rubbing to avoid saturating the area.

Décor items: Occasionally use a vacuum with a soft brush attachment to dust things such as window treatments, curtains, blinds and shares. To help prevent mildew or mold on the shower curtain, clean it frequently. Décor glass can be cleaned with a glass cleaner to remove smudges. Be sure to take care around any etching that might exist on the glass.

Hardware & Sink or Shower Fixtures: Use a mild dish soap and water to clean these fixtures. Avoid harsh chemicals or sprays. For hard water spots, a mild solution of vinegar and water works well.

Paneling: Use a mild solution of soap and luke warm water with a soft sponge or cloth. Avoid abrasive cleaners as they could cause damage such as scratching or dullness. All-purpose spray cleaner works well for those stubborn dirt and grease spots. Harsh cleaners and organic solvents are not recommended because they can attack the vinyl.

Cabinetry & Tables: Simply dust with a soft cloth dampened with cleaning polish or mild detergent solution to keep hardwood doors, cabinet fronts and tables looking like new. Ammonia based products or silicone oils may cause damage if used over a long period of time so avoid using those types of products. Promptly wipe up spills to avoid potential problems.

Counter-tops: Avoid harsh chemicals such as drain cleaners, oven cleaners, etc. and do not let cleaners with bleach set on the top. Wipe those off immediately. For laminate counter-tops stubborn stains can be removed with a general-purpose spray cleaner. For solid surface counter tops soapy water, ammonia based cleaners or commercially available solid surface cleaners will remove most dirt and residue from all types of finishes. A damp cloth followed by a dry towel will remove watermarks.

Flooring: For carpet, be sure to vacuum regularly to avoid stains. If you have tough and deep stains, have them professionally steam cleaned. Spot removers can be used for minor spills. Always test the carpet for color fastness in an inconspicuous area before using any product. For vinyl flooring, it is good to periodically vacuum or sweep. Spills are easier to clean if wiped up before they set. Blotting with a paper towel should work. To clean more deeply, use a damp mop with water and a mild cleaner. Do not soak the flooring. Use care to avoid wetting the carpet edges. Also, don’t use cleaners that contain oil based solvents to avoid yellowing linoleum.

There you have it, some basic cleaning guidelines for the inside of your RV. As always, if you have questions, please contact your central Pennsylvania RV Dealer or your trailer’s manufacturer.

Buying a used or new RV in Pennsylvania

Whether you purchase a used RV or travel trailer in Pennsylvania from an individual or a central Pennsylvania RV dealer, there are certain things you should check before making the transaction. Usually, a dealership,like Lerch RV will repair the RV or travel trailer, if needed, before selling it, so a used travel trailer or a used central Pennsylvania RV dealer  is a better option.

If you are buying a trailer from a private individual, make sure everything works.If the travel trailer or RV comes with a generator, start the generator to ensure it works. Let it run for at least 10 minutes. While the generator is running, check the interior. Turn on the lights. Start the refrigerator if it has the option to run on electric. Check the microwave. Check the faucets to make sure the handles, the shower handle and the drain plugs all work. There may not be water in the tank, but you want to ensure that the handles are not stripped. Some drain plugs have a handle on the spigot or the faucet — these are the things you need to check.

Make sure the toilet operates properly. The flush and rinse sliders — if you have that type of toilet — should operate without sticking, and they should not be loose.

If the travel trailer or fifth wheel RV has an air conditioning unit, turn the air conditioning on to make sure it works. If the heat uses gas, you may not be able to check the heat unless there is gas in the tanks. The same goes for the stove.

Once you are happy that everything works on generator, plug the RV into an outlet if possible. Check to see if everything works with the RV or travel trailer plugged in.

Check in all cabinets for roof leaks. Roof check around the vents for signs of leakage. In most cases, a dealership will repair the leak and fix the water spots on the ceiling, but they may not fix the water spot in the overhead cabinets. Check under the RV or travel trailer to ensure that the floor is not rotting out if it is wood. A lot of older campers were made completely of wood, which tends to rot, especially at the wheel wells. Check the tires. Make sure they have decent tread on them and that the tires do not look dry-rotted.

If you are purchasing a motorized RV, check all the fluids. The radiator should have antifreeze and water and it should be clean. Antifreeze could be green or orange, depending on the type used in that motor. Check the oil. The oil should look clean. Check the transmission fluid. Transmission fluid should be pink. If it is brown or smells bad — transmission fluid has a distinct smell when it is new, and smells pretty nasty when there is something wrong — there could be a problem with the transmission. Check the brake fluid.

Start the RV and take it for a test drive. Make sure the RV shifts correctly. If it has an automatic transmission and shift fine on its own, check it further by manually shifting it through the gears. At a stop, put it in first gear. Move forward. As the rpm raises, shift it into second, than third. You should hear or feel the shifts. If the RV has a tachometer, the tach should drop when you shift the transmission.

When you get back to the dealer or individual that you are buying the RV from, check the oil and transmission fluid again. The oil should still look clean and should not have a frothy look to it. If the oil looks frothy — almost like someone poured milk into the oil — the RV could have a head gasket problem. The transmission fluid should still be pink. Check around all of the hoses and make sure nothing is leaking.

If the RV engine runs smoothly and the fluids look good — and the price is right — you may have just found yourself your next great adventure.