Pennsylvania is RV Friendly

Pennsylvania is RV friendly, be on the look out for this RV logo

RVers look for this logo

CAMP HILL, Pa. — Pennsylvania now welcomes RVers with the official “RV Friendly” logo designed to let travelers know which businesses can accommodate their RV, the Pennsylvania RV and Camping Association reported today.

The state recently adopted the popular “RV Friendly” highway sign logo for use in the state’s local business logo program. The RV Friendly Sign is a highly visible, round, bright yellow reflector sign with “RV” in the center. It is designed for roadside businesses – such as gas stations, restaurants, tourist attractions and lodging/camping facilities – to place on their existing highway gas-food-lodging logos indicating their ability to provide adequate space and resources for RVers.

“We are so excited that the RV Friendly logo signs have been approved,” Rebecca Lenington, executive vice president of PRVCA. “We’ve been working on this for a while and feel it is a win-win for both RVers and local businesses.”

The RV Friendly signs prove to be a valuable tool for RVers since they can easily tell which businesses are convenient for them to shop, eat or fuel up. Businesses must meet certain requirements in order to be RV Friendly such as having high canopies, an adequate turning radius, and 12 foot wide lanes. For a complete list of criteria, contact Loisrae Graybill at the PA Logo Trust at 717.412.4378.

SOURCES: Greg Gerber(RVdailyReport)/Pennsylvania RV and Camping Association press release

Arriving safely in the rain.

After the week we have had here in central Pennsylvania, I felt this would be a great blog posting. Eventually all of us will camp in the rain at some point of our RVing life. If you have to travel in the rain to reach your destination or on your way back home, here are some great tips to help you reach that destination safely.

The Spring and Summer seasons brings all kinds of new weather conditions, including the increased chance for rain. In order to remain safe while driving or towing your RV it is important to be aware of the necessary precautions that should be taken in the event you find yourself driving in severe weather – including rain storms.

The Weather Channel has provided drivers with the following tips to take into account when driving on wet roads and in rainy weather.

1. In order to avoid hydroplaning, you should always make sure your tires are inflated properly and that your tire tread is in good condition. Never put off replacing your tires when they need to be.

2. In order to prevent skidding on the wet pavement, you should always drive slow and carefully, especially on curves and turns. You should also steer and brake with a light touch, and be careful not to make any quick movements with your vehicle. Never slam on your brakes in rainy, slick conditions and risk locking the wheel and skidding.

3. If you do happen to begin hydroplaning, again maintain a light hand on the steering wheel and brakes and do not brake or turn suddenly. Instead ease up on the gas and slowly pump the brakes if you need to.

4. If you do happen to skid in your RV, ease off the gas, steer into the direction you want your vehicle to go, and remain calm. You should also anticipate having to turn the steering wheel over and over until the front of the vehicle is traveling in a straight line.

5. Always remember to anticipate rainy weather and hazardous driving conditions. Slow down on wet roads, avoid driving through puddles, follow the drive tracks in front of you left by another driver, and always pay attention to others around you. A defensive driver is the best type of driver.

Being prepared for driving and towing your RV safely in the rain is an important part of being an Lerch RV owner.

Triple Towing: Legal or not in your state?

tiple towing, Lerch RV, Pennsylvania RV Dealership,PA RV Sales, RV dealership

Sometimes when traveling we just need to take a bit more equipment than the average family. For example you might want to tow a boat & a camper behind your vehicle. This is known as triple towing.  It is important to know your limits when it comes to triple towing.

Triple towing is illegal in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. However the good news is that in most states it is legal to tow two trailers at the same time behind your vehicle. It is allowed in the following States:

  • Alaska
  • Arizona
  • Arkansas
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Idaho
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Iowa
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • Louisiana
  • Maryland
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • Montana
  • Nebraska
  • Nevada
  • New Mexico
  • North Dakota
  • Ohio
  • Oklahoma
  • South Dakota
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Utah

But things aren’t always just black and white so here are some exceptions to the rule. And the states listed above can change their laws at any time. States will have different variations of triple towing so it might restrict your abilities to triple tow.

Be sure to find out which states limit the total length of all 3 units to 65 feet. But in other circumstances the limit is 70 feet or 75 feet total length. Other issues you might find is that States can also limit the second trailer to recreational equipment, such as a boat, snowmobile, or ATV 4-wheelers.  Special endorsement on your driver’s license to tow any trailer over 10,000 lbs or to drive a motor-home that is over 40 feet in length is required in California.

Some good websites that contain the rules and guidelines for triple towing by State are Woodall’s Rules of the Road & Towing World. Although these websites do contain good information, it is important to know that rules and laws can change frequently and information can often times get mixed up so be sure to find out the latest rules and regulations before you plan your trip.  To do this, contact the Transportation Department or Highway Patrol in your State & the States you are traveling through.

Lastly, remember that safety is the name of the game when it comes to triple towing so be sure that you are properly following all safety measures and regulations. Triple towing requires a great deal of responsibility. This responsibility includes being able to maneuver in close spaces, using your brake with enough room to stop safely, and knowing how to back up all those units without causing a wreck. But most importantly, use common sense and watch your surrounds.

** This information came from “The Fun Times Guide” on their article called “Triple Towing: What You Need To Know Before You Pull 2 Trailers Behind A Car, Truck, or RV”.

***Lerch RV does not recommend triple towing.  And if you decide to triple tow, do so only after you know all the risks. Make sure you can see 200 feet behind the last vehicle you’re towing (towing mirrors help with this), and when you are backing up, you know how to maneuver your trailers properly. Check all State laws and guidelines when tripe towing or even thinking about triple towing. And remember it is illegal to triple tow in the state of Pennsylvania. 

****Article adapted from towing article found on Bish RV blog.

Pennsylvania RV Owners Be Aware! Please USe Safe Towing Tips

Defensive driving skills and practice result in safe, enjoyable towing

Towing a trailer is certainly not difficult, but it does represent a step up in complexity from driving a solo vehicle, requiring new awareness of combined vehicle length, trailer width, braking distance, turning characteristics and several other vital factors that must be considered while towing a trailer. Most of us drive trucks, SUVs or passenger cars daily, and graduate to RVs only occasionally. Thus, it’s always necessary to make a mental transition and try to keep the size and handling characteristics of the larger rig in mind. Allowing solo-vehicle habits to take over may result in a tendency to make turns too tightly, run over curbs, hit stationary objects such as overhanging tree limbs or to follow too closely.

Eyes on the Road
The first towing precautions are those that precede towing — matching the tow vehicle and trailer correctly, adhering to weight limits and making sure hitch selection and adjustment are correct, as described elsewhere in this guide. And it’s also important to refresh defensive driving skills. From there, the real fun begins. The combined length of tow vehicle and trailer, as well as the combined weight, must be in the forefront of your mind, right from the start. Maintaining extended following distances is one of the most important towing-related driving habits that initially is difficult to adhere to because we tend to fall into our typical driving habits. Even though trailer brakes may be functional, braking distances almost always are extended.

It’s also important to make lane changes carefully and slowly, and to allow extended distances for passing. Good, solidly mounted extendable mirrors with large reflective areas — adjusted properly — are also essential. Speedy traffic seems more tolerant of slow 18-wheelers than of slow RVs, which makes courtesy an important safety factor for RV owners because an irate driver trying to pass can be a serious safety threat; courtesy is not only the consideration of others, it’s a safety issue. Frequent monitoring of rearview mirrors is necessary; when a vehicle is tailgating and trying to pass, we should help by driving slightly to the right to give the other driver a better view of the road ahead, even if a passing opportunity does not exist at the time. We should use turnouts whenever possible and avoid following another vehicle so closely that a vehicle overtaking from the rear cannot return to the proper lane.

Time for a Brake
While RV brakes are adequate for most situations, care is necessary to avoid overheating, which can lead to brake fade. If brake fade occurs, it will likely be on steep downgrades. If this happens, friction will raise the temperature of brake pads and linings to extremely high levels, resulting in temporary loss of braking. The cure is prevention — downshifting to a gear range that is low enough to retard speed sufficiently that brakes need not be used more than occasionally. This way, enough braking performance is reserved to make an emergency stop, should it become necessary.

When braking on a grade is necessary, apply the brakes intermittently, with moderate pressure, and release the pedal to allow the brakes to cool. The action of electric trailer brakes should be apparent to the driver, and sufficient enough to handle the trailer’s weight. The controller should be adjusted so that maximum braking action does not cause trailer-wheel lockup. Improper controller adjustment is a major cause of inadequate braking, so it’s wise to study the manufacturer’s instructions. Travel-trailer instability (fishtailing) should not occur in a well-balanced, well-hitched combination, but if it does, independent activation of trailer brakes usually will bring the trailer back into line.

Back-Up Plans
All trailers require more space for turns, and travel trailers follow the tow-vehicle track more closely than do fifth-wheels, which track farther to the inside of a turn. There is need for continual awareness, which should eventually become second-nature after a modest amount of on-the-road experience. Fifth-wheel trailers are different to back than conventional trailers, and require more practice for someone accustomed to backing a conventional trailer. A well-used technique involves placing one’s hand at the bottom of the steering wheel and moving it in the same direction the trailer is intended to go. It’s more effective with travel trailers than with fifth-wheels, which often require more turning of the steering wheel. Hand-held two-way radios can allow an assistant to more effectively relay backing instructions to the driver.

Before each trip, it’s essential to check the tires to assure that inflation pressures match those molded on tire side walls (cold), or that they are appropriate for your load (consult load/inflation tables). Also, be sure to inspect all vehicle fluids and make sure trailer-wheel lug nuts are tightened to factory specifications. Trailering is a great way to explore the new horizons and a great way to check out the wonderful camping destinations that are available to owners of recreational trailers. But always keep in mind that defensive driving will pay off in safe travel.

If you have any questions about safe towing practices, call your central Pennsylvania RV Dealer at 800-722-1236.  We will gladly answer any questions that you may have.

Safe Travels and Happy RVing!

Portions of this blog are a re-posting of an article from Trailer Life Magazine