RV Shoppers check us out. Making RV Buying Easy

Lerch RVs prices will light up your life. Low prices, great selection on Keystone and Open Range RVs.

Before you decide on what may appear to be an impressive deal from an internet dealer in another state, shop Lerch RV first.

We are an exclusive Keystone RV Company dealer carrying all popular brands such as Montana, Mountaineer, Outback, Sydney by Outback, Sprinter, Sprinter Copper Canyon Edition, Passport, Springdale, Summerland, Fuzion, Vantage and more! We are also Pennsylvania’s largest Open Range dealership, with a great selection of Open Range, Light, Roamer, Journeyer travel trailers and fifth wheels.

Along with providing incredible savings to our customers, Lerch RV offers RV delivery to anywhere in Pennsylvania and surrounding Mid-Atlantic states. Or even as far as Texas and Maine. Our Canadian friends, are welcome to shop with us as well. We will  bring your new fifth wheel or travel trailer right to a driveway, campsite, Walmart parking lot, or other convenient location of your choice. Inquire with a Lerch RV Sales Team member about the associated costs of delivery through our preferred RV delivery service. However keep in mind that your new RV is only a small scenic road trip away. Plus you can enjoy one of Central Pennsylvania’s excellent campgrounds, stay at the Award Winning Buttonwood Campground or the Waterside Campground. Both located along the beautiful Juniata River.

Distance to Lerch RV from majors cities in the Mid-Atlantic States

  • South Burlington, VT 8hrs 41mins – 468 miles
  • New York, NY 4hrs 22mins – 230 miles
  • Pittsburgh, PA 3hrs 2mins – 159 miles
  • Philadelphia, PA 3 hrs 18mins – 171 miles
  • Trenton, NJ 3 hrs 38mins – 192 miles
  • Dover, DE 4 hrs – 191 miles
  • Baltimore, MD 2hrs 44mins – 144 miles
  • Charleston, WV 6hrs – 345 miles
  • Richmond, VA 5hrs 15mins – 271 miles

Your new RV will be ready to go camping. Not only do you get full LP bottles, a new deep cycle RV auxiliary battery with heavy-duty storage box, a full customer orientation walk through (up to 2 hours), and a current Pennsylvania state inspection. You also get full dealer prep of your new unit (PDI).

  • All RV LP systems will be tested and inspected for your safety
  • All RV safety systems will be tested and inspected
  • All RV plumbing systems will be tested and inspected
  • All RV 110V and 12V electrical systems will be tested
  • Roof and Underbelly will be inspected
  • Tires and wheel bearings inspected

Any issues that may arise from these tests will be taken care of under the RV manufacturer’s warranty or by the dealer before the unit is delivered to you. Your new fifth wheel or travel trailer will also be cleaned inside and out by our dedicated RV detailing department. Any RV manufacturing dust and debris will be cleaned from the inside of the coach. You will also be provided with a Lerch RV gift card to use in central Pennsylvania’s largest RV parts store.  We will also perform any hitch or brake work needed on the same day you pick up. No second trips, you can start to enjoy your new camper and making those great family memories right away.

And on the day you accept delivery of your new RV, you pay no additional or hidden fees.

At an internet dealer such as, Pete’s RV Center. You will be charged up to an additional $199 for just a portion of the above customer treatment.

We’ve been a full-service dealership for more than 35 years and understand that buying a new RV is an important and sometimes confusing decision. Putting customers first, our RV Sales Team is prepared to answer frequently asked RV buyer questions and make the sales process an easy and stress-free experience. Just remember at Lerch RV you shop at your leisure and pace. Not a sales persons. We make every aspect of the RV buying experience EASY…

Safe travels and Happy RVing!

Dog Days of Summer got you down? Let us help…

Lerch RV Dog Days of Summer, Great RV prices!

The internet defines the term Dog Days of Summer as this:

Dog Days” (Latin: diēs caniculārēs) are the hottest, most sultry days of summer.  The Dog Days originally were the days when Sirius rose just before or at the same time as sunrise (heliacal rising), which is no longer true, owing to precession of the equinoxes. The Romans sacrificed a brown hop[citation needed] at the beginning of the Dog Days to appease the rage of Sirius, believing that the star was the cause of the hot, sultry weather.

The Dog Days of Summer are also defined as a period of stagnation. Your Central PA RV Dealer has been anything but stagnant this Summer. Our travel trailer and 5th wheel inventory is ever-changing.  Do not miss out on your new RV.  Why waste time and money heading to large high pressure RV Show, when you can come browse our lot at your leisure with no pressure.  I can guarantee you will not have a sales person breathing down your neck or stalking you on our lot.  Our entire inventory is open and available to you.  Just another way we continue to make buying easy for our customers.

Officially Summer is drawing to a close, even though the heat and humidity will continue to vex the Northeast for some time to come.  To help our customers beat the heat, Lerch RV continues to offer low cool Summer prices!

If you are looking for a new travel trailer or fifth wheel, please visit Pennsylvania’s largest travel trailer.  And if you are looking for a pre-owned camper, Lerch RV has those a great selection of those too.  Come visit our central PA dealership location and beat the heat.  Our prices are so low, they will make you shiver.

Enjoy the rest of the Summer…Safe travels and Happy RVing!

Leaky RV Window? Here is the fix…

Much like the window and door frames on your house, the window frames of an RV are sealed with caulk. Over time, caulk eventually decays, causing a leak. With their thinner walls, these leaks are much more apparent on an RV. They can also be much more destructive to the plywood construction used in many RV models. You should act to replace the caulking on the window as soon as you become aware that the window is leaking.

Step 1

Inspect the caulking around the perimeter of the RV window frame. Wherever the caulk is cracked, crumbling or a gap has opened between the bead of caulk and the window frame is a potential leak.

Step 2

Remove the damaged caulk from the RV window frame. Cut and pry up the bead of caulk with a disposable razor blade or a putty knife, and pull as much of the bead out by hand as possible. Remove the remaining caulk by scraping it out with a razor.

Step 3

Clean the RV window frame seams. If there are any major bits of old, damaged caulk still in the seam, break it down and remove it with an acetone-based solvent. Then wash out the seam with car wash detergent, water and an old rag. Allow the clean-up to dry before proceeding.

Step 4

Caulk the RV window frame with RV sealant. Apply steady pressure to the caulking gun’s trigger as you slowly draw a constant bead of caulk around the window frame, filling up the seam. Gently remove any excess caulk with the razor blade.

Things You’ll Need:

  • Disposable razor blades
  • Putty knife
  • Acetone-based solvent (if possible)
  • Car wash detergent
  • Old rags
  • Caulking gun
  • RV sealant
If your know your leak is a bigger headache then a simple drop or two of water, do not hesitate to contact your Central PA RV Dealership for service.  Our fully staffed RV service department has well over 100 years of combined RV Service experience.  Give us a call at 800-722-1236 for all your travel trailer and fifth wheel needs.

RV Propane Tank Safety..LPG in PA

RV Tanks at Lerch RV in PA

Dual 30 lb LP Bottle Sketch

One of the main systems that helps your RV function on all levels is your propane system.  Without your propane, you lose most of the accessories that make your RV comfortable to use.  But did you know that you have to keep your propane cylinders certified?  If you are the owner of an older RV, then this is something that you need to check out to make sure that your propane system meets safety standards.

When you buy a new RV, you can go twelve years before having your cylinders certified.  After the first twelve-year check, you need to have it certified every five years after that.  Here’s some more information about propane certification from rvbasics.com:

If you have an older RV you should know that according to Federal law, DoT cylinders may only be used for 12 years after their manufacture date. After that, the cylinders must be “re-certified” which provides another five years of use. The cylinders can be re-certified every five years thereafter.Propane dispensers are legally required to look at the date stamped on the cylinder before filling it. Some dealers actually do look. We’ve been reminded a few times that our cylinders were about to expire. Check the date stamped on your cylinders… don’t rely on your rig’s model year even if the cylinders are original. It’s quite possible they are a year or older than your rig. Ours were.

Re-certification is usually done by the large bulk propane suppliers but we found one of our local RV repair shops was certified to do the job and they do it for free! Call around to see who may do it in your area.

Some other simple tips to follow as well:

Inspect your Propane Appliances

You should also have the tech check your fridge and any other propane appliances inside your RV.

Install Properly and Identify

You should have a way to identify the presence of a propane tank if your tank is hidden. ASME-identified tanks should be installed horizontally, and DOT-identified cylinders are installed vertically.

Replace Damaged Tanks

If you have a damaged tank, including dents and rust, or damage to a hose, you should replace your tank.

Don’t Overfill

Since the late 1980s, tanks with capacities of 40 lbs. and less have a overfilling protection device, or OPD. If you have an older tank, have a OPD installed. Don’t fill your tank with the RV running, or with anyone in it, if you are filling the tank while still attached to the RV.

Detecting a Leak

If you think you have a leak or smell gas, everyone needs to get out of the RV quickly. Leave the door open to your RV and shut off the supply valve.

If you have any questions regarding your propane bottles/cylinders, please give your Central PA RV Dealer a call.  You can reach the Lerch RV Service Department at 800-722-1236.

And if you are looking for that new travel trailer or fifth wheel, do not forget to give our Sales Team a call as well.

Trailer Tire Safety: Check your Tires Before Hitting the Road

The wheels on your RV go round and round, round and round…until…boom!

Ask yourself these questions:

When was the last time I checked the air pressure?

How old are your tires on your trailer?

When was the last time they were replaced?

RV Tires

You can’t judge your tires by how they look. Kicking them is not going to tell you anything either. Trailer tires are only meant to last three to six years on average. Just because they look good and the tread looks brand new does not mean that the tires are not rotting away on the inside.


Tires deteriorate over time whether you drive on them daily or just once a year.

Tire deterioration can happen from the UV rays from the sun, going over the allotted speed the tires can handle, going over the weight amount allotted for the trailer capacity and its tires, exceeding the maximum or falling under the minimum tire pressure of the tires, and finally, using products with petroleum distillates on your tires. All of these actions can cause your tires to deteriorate at a faster rate. Proper use and care of your tires will allow you to get the longest, safest use out of them.

Here are some tips to keeping your RV’s tires in good shape:

  1. Use covers to protect your tires from the sun. The UV rays from the sun can crack and damage your tires. If your trailer is parked longer than a weekend, make sure to cover your tires with tire covers.
  2. Make sure you know the MPH your tires are designed for. Trailers come with special trailer tires and the majority have a maximum speed rating of 65 MPH. By accelerating past that speed could cause serious damage to your tires, especially if your trailer is loaded down with weight.
  3. Make sure not to overload your trailer to over its capacity because your tires are affected too. The more pressure on your tires, the more stress you put on your tires. Especially if you are going over the maximum speed the tires can handle.
  4. Keeping your tires at the correct tire pressure is essential to not only the health of your tires but to your load weight and speed. Improper tire inflation is the number one factor in tire failure. Most RV and camper service personnel  recommend to inflate your tires to the maximum PSI stamped on the sidewall of the tire. Be aware of how the weather elements affect tire pressure. Higher elevations increase tire pressure as does warmer temperatures. Make sure to check your tires before hitting the road every time! Do a visual inspection for tire inflation, wear, bulging, cracking and anything that looks unusual.
  5. Only use soap and water to clean your tires. Using protective chemicals that have petroleum distillates will weaken your tires strength.
  6. Think about using Nitrogen to inflate your tires instead of compressed air.  Nitrogen has been found to pro-long the life of the tire. Nitrogen allows the tire to run cooler while in use.
  7. Replace your tires every three to six years, regardless of the miles you’ve put on them or the tread depth. When we’re talking three to six years, we mean from the time when the tire was manufactured. Each tire has a date stamped on the sidewall stating the manufactured date. There is how to read one.

The date code looks something like this: DOT PDHH MLOR 3403.

The date code always starts with a DOT and ends with a 3 or 4 digit number. Those last numbers are the date code. The first two numbers indicate the week (out of 52) and the last one or two digits indicate the year it was manufactured in. So, from the date code above, 3403 means the 34th week of 2003, or the fourth week of August 2003. So, from that date, your tires would need to be replaced between August 2006 and August of 2009.

Another thought to keep in mind, blow outs and flat tires happen. So always carry a spare tire, jack and the proper tools to fix your flat tire while you are traveling.

**The information from this post was taken from RV Chat With Ron Fleming “How Old Are the Tires on Your RV?”

For more information, please consult your tire’s manufacturer or the RV’s manufacturer.

Tire identification diagram

Image via Wikipedia

Are you a happy camper? If not read thes tips…

Trashy Campground image

It’s bound to happen if you are an RVer.  You will get to your camp site and realize that you have some less than ideal neighbors.  It may be little things such as loose trash or too much noise, or even sever such as people who try to get confrontational.  The best thing that you can do in these situations is to be the better camper and hope that they will pick up on some of your routines.

Being a great camper means more than having the best equipment, it means allowing everyone around you to have a great time without causing any problems.  Here are five tips from your-rv-lifestyle.com on how to become a better camper.

  1. Follow the rules: Individual parks usually hand you a copy of their rules when you register. Adhering to these rules is one of the basics of campground etiquette. It makes things easier for everyone involved – you, your neighbors and the park operators. Typical guidelines include reduced speed limits on campground roads for the safety of all involved. You are typically expected to unhook a dinghy before driving to your site. There are usually defined quiet hours when you should keep the noise down, turn off outdoor lights, generators – basically, the party is over.
  2. Eliminate pet peeves: Literally. Pick up after your pets. Stop excessive or extended barking. Don’t leave a howling dog unattended to bother the neighbors. Use a leash. Even if Spot is friendly, not everyone is an animal lover. Good pet-etiquette on your part helps ensure that the many RVers with pets are welcome at campgrounds.
  3. Parking the rig: Sometimes it is very clear how to orient the rig on a site – you may even have a cement pad. But in many cases, the only guideposts will be the hookup for electric and sewer. General campground etiquette is to stay on your side of that hook-up, and not have awnings or slide-outs encroaching on the site next door. Look at the campground map for a clue about preferred orientation. Or, look around you to see how other rigs are angled, if they are centered on sites or close to the utility hook up. You will get the most out of the space you have (and so will your neighbors) if you are all situated the same way. There are bound to be exceptions – we have been in many campgrounds with no uniformity in the size, shape or orientation of sites. The main objective in these cases is to just “guess the site” and fit the RV into it. But even then, the idea is to park in a way that gets everyone their fair share of privacy and room under their respective awnings. Common sense and campground etiquette go hand in hand.
  4. Late arrivals: If you are arriving at a park after normal quiet hours, attempt some degree of stealth behavior. Not that it is easy to be unobtrusive pulling in an RV. But keep the set-up to the minimum required for the night. Your neighbors will understand that you need to pull in and hook up. They have probably been in the same situation. But they will lose patience if they spend an hour listening to loud conversation, slamming doors and arguments over how to level the rig. Do what is essential and remember that tomorrow is another day. The same sort of courtesy should be used if you are making an early morning departure. Don’t keep the engine idling for an hour before you leave. Tidy up your campsite the night before.
  5. Sewer connections: Do them right. Make them secure. No torn hoses. In most places, your sewer connection faces the side where you neighbor has their “patio” area. Another time where being discreet and careful is part of good campground etiquette.

There are more tips in the article, and I recommend that you give it a good read through. When you become a better camper, you will have a better time on the road. If you are looking for a new RV to become the best camper you can be in, then check out Lerch RV, Pennsylvania‘s largest travel trailer dealer.

Camping Season is here!

Open Range Rolling Thunder H 397 RGR at Lerch RV

Camping Season is here.Whether you camp in a tent or a Open Range Rolling Thunder. Maintenance is a must....

Many of us are in full camping mode.  With the unofficial start of Summer, Memorial Day, already a past us.  Our service department is has been getting some customer calls on a few items.  I decided to gather up some of those items and share them with you.  The items below are something that all RV owners should keep an eye on.  Once again, my belief that a little preventative maintenance goes a very long way.

  • RV Water heater bypass valves. These must be in the proper position to ensure that water fills the water heater tank. Ensure the tank is filled before turning on the water heater as you could damage the electric heating element or the water tank itself by overheating an empty tank.
  • Roll up your RV awning in windy conditions or if you are to be away from the campsite. It is an easy thing to do (especially with the newer electric awnings) to ensure that your awning does not get damaged by the wind.  Or worse yet flip-up and over your camper damaging the structure.
  • RV/Marine Battery water levels. With many people leaving their campers plugged in over the summer for extended periods, it is important to maintain your battery’s water levels so they do not boil off. Check them frequently to ensure proper levels and top off with distilled water or recommended fluids.
  • Sealants. Inspect your seams around windows, doors, vents, and wall corners to ensure that the caulking is not cracked and leaving voids. Keep a tube of RV Caulking handy in your camper to seal any found voids. It takes 15-20 minutes to check over a whole camper, but, will ensure your camper weathers the storm for decades.
  • RV AC Coils. Get up on your camper roof safely and inspect the AC coils and remove debris. If needed get the coils straightened so that your AC runs more efficiently ensuring you have a cool place to sleep out of the heat. However do keep in mind if the weather decides to creep up to near record high temperatures and high humidity levels, your RV air conditioning unit may work extremely hard trying to keep you cool. After this past Memorial Day, with its record heat index, many RV owners called complaining that their AC units were not functioning properly.

If you are unsure about tackling any of the above RV maintenance issues above by yourself.  Please give Lerch RV’s service department a call at 800-722-1236.  Our qualified technicians will gladly answer any questions that you might have.  And if you decide you do not want to do the work yourself, schedule an appointment when you call.

Safe Travels and Happy RVing!