Camping is for the dogs too!

Camping is for the dogs too!

Camping is for the dogs too!

Pennsylvania camping is for the dogs (and other pets too.)

No one understands family like Lerch RV. That’s why when we say “family”, our four-legged, furry friends are always included.  Camping is a great way to bring families closer and often that includes pets. That is why your central Pennsylvania RV dealership is pet friendly. You can always find a few four-legged friends inside our dealership.  Customer are always welcome to bring their pets inside with them. We are dog friendly as long as your dog is friendly as well.

Pet Friendly Campgrounds:

No need to leave any family members behind when you head out for a family camping trip.  We’ve found a great resource for finding pet friendly campgrounds! There are many internet sites out there that will help you find a campground that both you and Fido will enjoy. Many more campgrounds, private and state funded are becoming pet friendly.

Camping Etiquette:

Pet friendly camping is the perfect way to include all family members in your vacation, but don’t forget, that does mean a little more work for you and your family.  Here are a 4 rules to remember when you RV with Spot:

  1. Pick it up: Always clean up after your dog (or other pets) after they’ve finished going to the bathroom.  No one wants to be out for a hike and step in Fido’s leave behinds.  Bring plenty of environmentally friendly pick up bags with you and dispose of them in dedicated receptacles.
  2. Know your limits: Your dog might be the friendliest dog you’ve ever met, but that doesn’t mean everyone’s dog is on the same page.  When leaving your campsite to roam the grounds, bring along a leash for those less than friendly encounters.
  3. No man (or pet) left behind: Remember the tent or RV you’re staying in might not feel like home to your family pet.  Try to minimize leaving your pet alone to reduce the amount of stress your pet experiences.  No one wants to be left out of all the fun!
  4. Watch the weather: Just like us humans, pets are sensitive to extreme hot and cold. On hot days, bring water and find rivers/lakes to help pets cool down. On cold days, think about leaving Fido in the RV or bringing along an adorable puppy jacket.
  5. Be courteous:Just be courteous of your neighbors and surroundings. Not everyone is a pet lover. So use a common sense approach when camping with your pets.

Have any other pet tips to share? We’d love to add them to our list. We love to hear from you…

Green clean your RV Pennsylvania!

When you’re an  avid RVer, it is easy to have a green perspective when it comes to our planet. After all, an RV gets you out into nature, taking you to places where you experience sunshine, fresh air, and beautiful scenery. Your Lerch RV allows you to explore the best of what our great country has to offer from comfortable surroundings. What is better than that?

An easy way to be Eco-conscious when you are experiencing the RV lifestyle is to go green when you clean. Here are five green cleaning tips that you can take on the road or even use at home if you desire to:

  1. Make your own: Cleaning green doesn’t have to cost a lot of green. There are many green products out there on the market but an easier and cheaper approach is to make your own cleaning solutions. All you need is good ole’ water, white vinegar, and baking soda. Between the three you can clean almost anything in your RV.
  2. Reduce and reuse: Think smart when you recycle. Instead of throwing out spray bottles when you’re out of cleaning solution, rinse them out and use them again! Reuse plastic baggies, plastic food containers, water bottles, and aluminum foil. Recycle when you can, but reusing is even greener!
  3. There’s nothing baking soda can’t do: Beyond being made into a cleaning solution, baking soda has tons of other uses around your RV (and your home). Sprinkle a little on your carpet or upholstery before vacuuming for a fresh scent, keep in your RV fridge as a deodorizer, and sprinkle into garbage cans to keep odors at bay. 
  4. Air freshener:  No need to add chemicals to your RV to give it that fresh smell.  In a 16-oz spray bottle, combine: 2 tablespoons of white vinegar, 2 tablespoons of fabric softener (use a natural/organic softener) and 6 to 10 drops of vanilla or almond extract. Fill the remainder of the bottle with water and you’ve got your own, green air freshener.
  5. Stains are out: Stains on vinyl are no match for a little lemon juice and elbow grease.  Use straight lemon juice to rub out any stains on your RV’s vinyl flooring.

It might require a wee bit more time to use some of the above ideas, and it might seem easier just to grab that bottle of cleaner. In the long run you will be doing yourself and the environment a favor.

Safe Travels and Happy RVing!

An RV checklist for everyone…

If you’re like us, you can’t wait to get your camper opened up for the camping season! (If you have not already done so.) In fact, we’re so eager we’ve compiled a checklist of items for you that will help you have a smooth, hassle-free camping season this year. Everyone who RVs should utilize a check list, like the one below. An RV checklist will help you open up the camper for the coming camping season, as well as when you put the camper away for the year.  The list below should be done while you are at home, doing so will allow you to enjoy a trouble-free camping trip.

 

RV START-UP CHECKLIST

  • Inspect and work all interior and exterior latches and locks (lube if necessary).
  • Make sure the batteries are fully charged and installed correctly. A bad battery can make for a bad camping trip.
  • Inspect the power cord and carefully clean the contacts if necessary. Plug in the power cord to an appropriate power source.
  • Turn on the interior lights and check outlets for polarity. If needed, replace any blown fuses. Check the circuit breakers and test the GFCI.
  • Inspect and test all safety detectors. If needed, replace any drained or discharged batteries. If you have a defective or damaged safety detector, replace it immediately.
  • Inspect and turn on the propane system. If you have any questions, contact your dealer or a qualified propane service representative for assistance.
  • If the propane system is functioning properly, test the pilot lights on range, refrigerator, furnace and water heater (if so equipped).
  • Inspect the leveling jacks (if so equipped) for operation. If needed, perform maintenance as specified by the leveling jack manufacturer.
  • Test all exterior and interior lights. Replace any bulbs if they are burnt out.
  • Inspect the tires for wear, cracks and inflation pressure.
  • Wash the exterior of the RV.
  • Do a sealant inspection and repair as necessary.
  • De-winterize and sanitize the fresh water system.
  • Connect your tow vehicle to the RV and test all connections and lights. This should be done every time you hook up to tow.

Some of the above items should be looked over a couple of times a year. We recommend having your RV thoroughly checked when you have your required state inspection completed.  Preventative RV maintenance will allow you to enjoy a trouble-free camper for many years to come.

Safe Travels and Happy RVing!

Boomers rolling into Retirement in RVs

Baby Boomers love RVing!

Baby boomers have long been recognized as a generation on the move and many of them have plans to pick up the pace even more in retirement.

They’re flying overseas for exotic African safaris, European river cruises and walks atop the Great Wall of China.

But they’re also staying closer to home, getting an up-close-and-personal view of the nation they grew up in, perhaps along two-lane roads, stopping for the night at some secluded campground. For those trips, many will use recreational vehicles.

RV sales have spiked in recent years due to several factors, including an improving economy and more boomers retiring.

“RV sales will benefit as aging baby boomers continue to enter the age range in which RV ownership is highest,” noted the authors of a 2012 report from the Recreation Vehicle Industry Association.

Boomers are drawn to RVs because they have, in general, always been drawn to travel.

Baby boomers, in fact, are America’s most traveled generation, even to this day, according to the AARP Public Policy Institute.

“When they were younger, baby boomers traveled more than older people, and now that they are older, they travel more than younger people,” according to a recent report from the institute.

The increase in interest by baby boomers has certainly been good news for RV dealers and manufacturers, but destinations, too, are adjusting to the influx of boomers.

RV travel is still camping, but many baby boomers are now accustomed to traveling in style so campgrounds are modifying their offerings as a result.

Many RV resorts have in recent years added wellness centers and exercise classes — two trends that have long been popular with baby boomers. Others offer concierge service, elegant dining halls and lighted tennis courts.

Some resorts have added live shows and musical acts to draw in boomers.

The Rocky Fork Ranch Resort in Eastern Ohio offers an indoor pool, fitness center and sauna.

Baby boomers also enjoy their technology so many campgrounds now offer cable TV and free Wi-Fi. It’s not exactly roughing it, but it’s certainly something many boomers don’t want to surrender while away from home.

“The baby boomers have arrived … and RV parks and resorts are responding by providing a greater variety of activities and entertainment,” Paul Bambei, president and CEO of the National Association of RV Parks and Campgrounds recently told RV Business magazine.

The RVs themselves these days also allow for luxurious travel. The big ones can be 40 feet long and cost $200,000 or more.

Some have maple cabinetry, satellite-fed LCD TVs, washer and dryers and even fireplaces. All in all, “camping” isn’t what it used to be and boomers are enjoying the change.

information written by RICK ADAMCZAK, The Daily Reporter

NPS-Closed Campgrounds,Fewer Seasonal Employees,Sunday Closures

Sequestration hits National Park Service, RVers and campers.

Closed campgrounds, Sunday closures of National Park System units, and 900 permanent positions that will go unfilled are just some of the latest details of how the National Park Service is responding to the ongoing federal budget sequestration.

* At Wind Cave National Park in South Dakota, officials said the 64-site Elk Mountain Campground would remain closed. That move eliminates the need for two summer employees to maintain the campground and interpretive rangers to present evening campfire programs, park officials said.

“The sequestration has forced us to make some tough decisions that will impact visitors to Wind Cave National Park,” said Superintendent Vidal Davila. “People will have fewer opportunities to tour Wind Cave, the park’s primary resource, as a result of less staff.”

The 5 percent budget cut also will lead to a reduction in invasive plant control at the park, maintenance of fences and building repairs, science and research activities, natural resource monitoring, and wildlife management programs.

* In Alabama, Park Service officials said the sequestration forces them to close the Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site, Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site, and the Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail on Sundays until further notice.

* At Voyageurs National Park in Minnesota, the cuts could lead to delays in snow plowing this spring on the Rainy Lake Ice Road, the Kab-Ash Ice Road, and the entrance to the Rainy Lake Visitor Center as park officials look to reduce fuel consumption and overtime pay.

Park officials say that when snowfall occurs before or after regular park operating hours, snow removal will be delayed until personnel report for normal duty hours. If significant snowfall occurs during weekends the Rainy Lake Visitor Center may be closed.

* At Badlands National Park in South Dakota, the 5 percent budget cut equates to a 24 percent reduction in seasonal hires for positions that support interpretive talks and walks, school programs, custodial services, road, fence and building repair and maintenance, science and research activities, natural resource monitoring, and search and rescue operations.

“The seasonal workforce is the heart of the park,” said Superintendent Eric Brunnemann. “This sort of loss cuts deeply into our ability to serve the public, something we are dedicated to doing every day.”

* Across the entire park system, 900 permanent positions that currently are vacant will not be filled, Park Service Director Jon Jarvis said Friday in a memo to the entire agency.

“In an organization with 15,000 permanent employees, 900 vacant jobs have a profound effect. Every activity will be affected. Some impacts will be immediate, others will accumulate over time,” Director Jarvis said. “Fewer law enforcement rangers and USPP officers mean lower levels of protection and longer response times. Fewer maintenance personnel mean that parks may have to close facilities completely when breakdowns occur – and that the $12 billion maintenance backlog will continue to grow.”

The memo did not, however, mention how many vacant positions the Park Service has been carrying in recent months.

Director Jarvis said the agency, system-wide, would see seasonal hirings drop by more than 1,000 employees, would furlough some staff in the U.S. Park Police, and would ban all non-essential travel.

“‘Essential’ travel includes only the following: travel that is critical for health and safety, and travel to attend training required to retain current, mission critical certifications – such as contracting warrants. International travel is cancelled,” wrote the director.

Director Jarvis also noted that the most recent continuing resolution to fund the federal government expires March 27.

“We do not know how, or if, the debate on a new continuing resolution will impact the remainder of Fiscal Year 2013 or the Fiscal Year 2014 budget negotiations. For now, please assume that we will operate for the remainder of the year at the 95 percent spending level envisioned in your sequestration plans,” he wrote.

From nationalparkstravel.com by NPT staff.

2013 York PA RV Show – York Campers Show

Say YES to the RV!

The York RV Show is being held once again this year at the York Fairgrounds, York Pennsylvania.

March 8-10,2013

Show Hours:

  • Friday 11am – 9pm
  • Saturday 10am – 9pm
  • Sunday 11am – 5pm.

Lerch RV will once again have the largest display of RVs at the York Camper/RV Show for our customers to view. Stop by our display in the Memorial Hall-East building. Along with having the lowest sale prices at the show on great travel trailers and fifth wheels. We will also be giving away a new iPad, and over $1,000 in additional prizes.

Say Yes to the RV and purchase you new RV at the York RV Show and we will reimburse your entry fee when you accept delivery of your new travel trailer or fifth wheel.

Do not forget to pick up a copy of our annual EARLY BIRD SALE flyer. This is your last chance to take advantage of our available low winter discounts.

Say Yes to the RV!

And buy now, before our industry leading manufacturers; Keystone RV and Open Range RV, raise their prices. Do not allow these discounts to disappear…

Give our Sales Team a call at 800-722-1236.

PA RV Dealer-RV sale-RV Show-low prices

Lerch RV Early Bird Sale

Fiberglass Propane Cyclinders for RVing?

Fiberglass propane cylinders lighter, more durable…

If you ever thought that in the world of propane cylinders, “There’s nothing new under the sun,” think again. How about an LP cylinder made, not from steel or aluminum, but from plastic and fiberglass? Sound a bit wild? Hang on, there’s a company that sells them, and you might just want to consider them.

The Lite Cylinder Company is happily turning out fiberglass/plastic composite LP gas cylinders, and yes, first off, they are government DOT approved for use on RVs. What makes these little tanks different from their typical steel cousins?

First, they’re a wee bit lighter–about 30% lighter than conventional steel cylinders. This translates into about four pounds lighter for a standard 20-pound (five gallon) cylinder. The next size up? Lite Cylinder offers a 25-pound (six-gallon plus) cylinder that scales in at just about 19 pounds. While it holds a gallon less than the steel standard, it does weigh six-pounds less.

But the weight of these LP containments isn’t the only consideration. The actual gas containment vessel is made of spun fiberglass and plastic. The resulting vessel is translucent–you’ll never need to guess how much (or better still–how little) fuel is left in the cylinder–you can see the level with you own eyes. The actual “tank” if you will, is contained in a strong plastic shell that provides a carrying handle, a flat base to sit on, and stackability–you can toss these guys one on top of another.

The materials used in construction of Lite’s cylinders are also completely impervious to rust. No more “painting” your tanks; they won’t scratch and look ugly.

Ah, but what about price? The 20-pound cylinders retail on Lite’s website for $99, while the largest vertical cylinder, the 25-pounder, retails for $120.00. That’s a bit higher than your average camping store $99 retail price for a 30-pounder, but take into consideration you don’t need any “accessories” like a gauge system to determine how much LP is left, and no $11.00 “tank foot” to keep your cylinder from falling over while transporting.

The government gives a 15-year life estimate to these fiberglass cylinders. They are subject to the usual fire code regulations for periodic recertification. Get more information, locate a dealer, or order directly at the Lite Cylinder web site.

Article Courtesy of RV TECH Tips.