RV & Camper News

News from around the  RVing and camping lifestyle.

Coal Township, PA :  Coal Township is asking for the public’s opinion on a proposed new ordinance, which could add a five-percent admissions tax to recreation parks such as the Anthracite Outdoor Adventure Area, Newsitem reports.  At its meeting Thursday night, the township’s board of commissioners voted 3-1 to advertise the ordinance, which has yet to be drawn up, for the admissions tax. Newsitem explains, the tax would apply on all activities allowable under the Commonwealth’s Local Tax Enabling Act “which would include, but is not limited to, campgrounds and outdoor recreation parks.”

- Gettysburg, PA :Gettysburg Bike Week celebrates 13 years of riding through historic Pennsylvania this year with rides, entertainment, vendors and more July 10 through 13 at Granite Hill Campground Resort.

- Washington DC : The 16-day federal government shutdown last October frustrated and angered RVers when federal lands became inaccessible. Now a study estimates that the shutdown of National Parks cost nearby communities $414 million in visitor spending.

- Arizona : Hibernation season for Arizona bears has evidently ended early, with reports of two bear sightings. In mid-February campers spotted a black bear near Peppersauce Campground outside of Tucson. In January a hunter reported seeing a sow and cub at Fort Huachuca.

Richland County, Mont.: health officials say they’ve had enough. According to the officials, “85 to 95 percent of RV parks” in the county are out of compliance with health laws so the county is dragging them into court to get them to clean up their acts. One hot-button issue: gray water. “Gray water out of your sink actually carries more pathogens than out of your toilet,” claims Terry Murphy, local compliance officer. There are 18 licensed RV and mobile home parks in the county.

- Mission, TX :Police in Mission, Texas, may have broken up a ring of thieves who specialized in stealing Ford F-250 pickups and selling them in Mexico. Police staked out Mission Bell RV Resort in February, where pickups had been previously stolen, and netted four adults and a juvenile who were charged in connection with at least one truck theft.

~ News From The Weird ~

- PUNTA GORDA, Fla. : Police arrested a Punta Gorda couple prowling an RV park Friday night while their children wandered through some nearby woods, Fox 4 reported.
Michael Scott Butcher and his wife, Sarah, were found by security guards at Water’s Edge RV Resort claiming to be looking for lost truck keys. When they wouldn’t leave, the couple was arrested for loitering or prowling, as well as possession of drugs.

Safe Travels and Happy RVing!

RV News and Tidbits

News from around the RVing Lifestyle

- Pennsylvania RV Court Ruling: The Pennsylvania Supreme Court denied Dingman Township’s request for appeal regarding a provision in the Subdivision and Land Development Ordinance after losing to Lake Adventure in a lower Court ruling in 2013.  The provision in question amended the definition of a recreation vehicle to one “that does not require a special highway moving permit when transported” and “a vehicular unit, mounted on wheels, of such size or weight as not to require special highway moving permits when drawn by motorized vehicles.  This is another great win for campgrounds and the RV industry,” Robert Adams, owner of Gettysburg Campground and PRVCA’s Campground Director. “This decision helps ensure that park models and destination camping remain a growing segment of the industry.”

- RV News: The Good Sam RV Travel Guide and Campground Directory has announced 2014’s top rated RV parks. Digital Journal explains, awarded with perfect 10/10/10 ratings, these 101 RV parks and campgrounds feature the most desired amenities, cleanest facilities and most attractive properties and locations. Long considered the Gold Standard by RVers, the ratings given to these top rated RV parks and campgrounds put them on every RVers’ list of places to visit in 2014. For a complete list, click here.

- ROANOKE, Va.: A recreational vehicle caught fire in the parking lot of the Roanoke Civic Center as families were heading inside to see the Kazim Temple Shrine Circus, according to Roanoke Times. The fire damaged three RVs in the parking lot full of other trucks and circus equipment, but only one RV had severe damage. Two adults and two children were displaced from the fire, Roanoke Times reports.  The cause of the was ruled as electrical, Roanoke Times explains.

- Richmond, Ind.: based Tom Raper RVs announced the launch of campersweather.com, a new website especially for campers and outdoor enthusiasts featuring weather forecasts, current conditions and weather alerts. According to a press release, the website, Facebook page, Twitter and a soon to be released mobile app are all free and include live weather radar, up-to-the-minute weather maps and weather related news.

- RV News: Stats on wholesale shipments of rigs seem to indicate it. U.S. wholesale annual shipments jumped 12.4 percent in December compared to the year before — about double 2009. On a monthly basis, December shipments were up 14.3 percent over 2013, the biggest December in six years, says the Recreation Vehicle Industry Association.

- Economy: Midwest propane prices continue to shoot upward. At one point last week, spot prices reached almost $5 per gallon, but dropped to $4.50. At the Kansas hub, prices reached $4.95, the highest since 1989.

- RV News: A fire in an electrical box at the Como, N.C., Camp PD Hunt Club got out of control and smoke was seen for miles. Local firefighters called in assistance, but in the end, 17 RVs parked at the club were wiped out.

~ News from the Weird ~

- RVs burn gas, but cows manufacture it, and in one case this week it caused a problem. Methane gas from 90 gassy cows exploded in a German farm shed, injuring one of the animals. High levels of flatulence had built up when a static electric charge caused the gas to explode with flashes of flames. One cow was treated for burns (hopefully, “rare” and not “well done”).

- This that make you go hmm? An RVer in Severance, Colo., who couldn’t get his motor home started tried using starter fluid. With somewhat predictable results, the rig caught fire and was totally destroyed. The twist? The rig was inside a local car wash when the fire broke out. No damage estimate on the car wash building.

Special thanks to CampingPA.com for supplying these great tidbits of RVing news…

Safe Travels and Happy RVing!

Visit the Adirondacks!

Welcome to the largest park in the lower 48.

indian-lake-adirondack-mountains-new-york

The peaceful view from a camping spot along scenic Indian Lake

The forever wild, the six million acre Adirondack Park of Northern New York. Experience the thrill of first discovery in the Adirondack Region of Northern New York (also known as the ADKs). A six-million-acre civilized wilderness, dotted with quaint towns and charming lakeside villages, the Adirondack Region is open year-round for adventure. Explore nature parks, tour historic sites and play at our many family friendly attractions. Named for the mountains within the park, the Adirondacks are part of the Northern Deciduous Forest, the largest temperate forest in the world. Larger than Vermont or Massachusetts; larger even than Yellowstone, Glacier, Grand Canyon, Great Smokies and Yosemite national parks combined, the Adirondacks are a haven for outdoor recreation. Conveniently, this natural wonder is located within a day’s drive for 60 million people.

canoeing-fishing-indian-lake-adirondack-mountains-new-york

Do not forget the canoe!

Scenic byways in and out of the region offer a drive through nature’s best.  Regardless of time of year, travel in and out of this region is beautiful.  Offering all kinds of outdoor recreational pleasures, skiing, hiking, camping, rafting, floating, walking, biking, relaxing, and those secluded scenic spots, those places where you can hear nothing but silence.  Only the sound of nature around you.

Why not take your next camping trip to the ADK’s and experience the true beauty of the forever wild.

Safe Travels and Happy RVing!

Have you been to the Grand Canyon of Pennsylvania?

grand-canyon-of-pennsylvania-pine-creek-gorge

The Pennsylvania Grand Canyon in its Autumn beauty.

The PA Grand Canyon Often referred to as the Grand Canyon of Pennsylvania and the Pine Creek Gorge, the PA Canyon area stretches for over 45 miles with depths of nearly 1500 feet. It’s dynamic topography creates many scenic wonders, including steep canyon walls and waterfalls. The PA Grand Canyon is part of the Tioga State Forest, beginning just south of Ansonia, PA, near Wellsboro in Tiago County.

With numerous developed trails the Grand Canyon of PA is a hikers paradise.  Year round activities include floating, boating, fishing, hiking, and biking are all part of the area’s available outdoor recreational opportunities.  The Pennsylvania Grand Canyon State Park areas display spectacular views.  Colton Point on the west rim and Leonard Harrison on the east rim of the canyon are the “must see” vistas to visit.  Camping and picnic areas are also available here as well.

One of the most popular areas to visit in the canyon is the Pine Creek Rail Trail, a converted railroad bed that travels along Pine Creek at the floor of the canyon. USA Today cites the Pine Creek Rail Trail as one of the ‘Top 10 Great Places to take bike tour’ in the world.  Due to the gentle grade, the trail offers easy peddling, hence it can be experienced with minimal physical impact and basic biking gear and experience.  Why not add this bike trail to your biking ‘bucket list’?

Come experience the Pennsylvania Wilds, and enjoy the beauty of route 6 which traversed the top half of the state.  You will not be disappointed in the Autumn beauty of this particular region of Pennsylvania.

Safe Travels and Happy Rving!

 

NPS-Closed Campgrounds,Fewer Seasonal Employees,Sunday Closures

Sequestration hits National Park Service, RVers and campers.

Closed campgrounds, Sunday closures of National Park System units, and 900 permanent positions that will go unfilled are just some of the latest details of how the National Park Service is responding to the ongoing federal budget sequestration.

* At Wind Cave National Park in South Dakota, officials said the 64-site Elk Mountain Campground would remain closed. That move eliminates the need for two summer employees to maintain the campground and interpretive rangers to present evening campfire programs, park officials said.

“The sequestration has forced us to make some tough decisions that will impact visitors to Wind Cave National Park,” said Superintendent Vidal Davila. “People will have fewer opportunities to tour Wind Cave, the park’s primary resource, as a result of less staff.”

The 5 percent budget cut also will lead to a reduction in invasive plant control at the park, maintenance of fences and building repairs, science and research activities, natural resource monitoring, and wildlife management programs.

* In Alabama, Park Service officials said the sequestration forces them to close the Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site, Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site, and the Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail on Sundays until further notice.

* At Voyageurs National Park in Minnesota, the cuts could lead to delays in snow plowing this spring on the Rainy Lake Ice Road, the Kab-Ash Ice Road, and the entrance to the Rainy Lake Visitor Center as park officials look to reduce fuel consumption and overtime pay.

Park officials say that when snowfall occurs before or after regular park operating hours, snow removal will be delayed until personnel report for normal duty hours. If significant snowfall occurs during weekends the Rainy Lake Visitor Center may be closed.

* At Badlands National Park in South Dakota, the 5 percent budget cut equates to a 24 percent reduction in seasonal hires for positions that support interpretive talks and walks, school programs, custodial services, road, fence and building repair and maintenance, science and research activities, natural resource monitoring, and search and rescue operations.

“The seasonal workforce is the heart of the park,” said Superintendent Eric Brunnemann. “This sort of loss cuts deeply into our ability to serve the public, something we are dedicated to doing every day.”

* Across the entire park system, 900 permanent positions that currently are vacant will not be filled, Park Service Director Jon Jarvis said Friday in a memo to the entire agency.

“In an organization with 15,000 permanent employees, 900 vacant jobs have a profound effect. Every activity will be affected. Some impacts will be immediate, others will accumulate over time,” Director Jarvis said. “Fewer law enforcement rangers and USPP officers mean lower levels of protection and longer response times. Fewer maintenance personnel mean that parks may have to close facilities completely when breakdowns occur – and that the $12 billion maintenance backlog will continue to grow.”

The memo did not, however, mention how many vacant positions the Park Service has been carrying in recent months.

Director Jarvis said the agency, system-wide, would see seasonal hirings drop by more than 1,000 employees, would furlough some staff in the U.S. Park Police, and would ban all non-essential travel.

“‘Essential’ travel includes only the following: travel that is critical for health and safety, and travel to attend training required to retain current, mission critical certifications – such as contracting warrants. International travel is cancelled,” wrote the director.

Director Jarvis also noted that the most recent continuing resolution to fund the federal government expires March 27.

“We do not know how, or if, the debate on a new continuing resolution will impact the remainder of Fiscal Year 2013 or the Fiscal Year 2014 budget negotiations. For now, please assume that we will operate for the remainder of the year at the 95 percent spending level envisioned in your sequestration plans,” he wrote.

From nationalparkstravel.com by NPT staff.

RV Lifestyle: Tips for beginners and vets

There’s never been a better time to take up the RV lifestyle.

Whether you’re a weekend wanderer, a snow bird or an RV full-timer, there’s an RV to suit any travel budget and taste.

With baby boomers reaching retirement age, more and more people are taking to the road with their motor homes, RVs or travel trailers. The Recreation Vehicle Industry Association recently reported that nearly 8 million American households have an RV, motor home or travel trailer and that there are as many as 30 million RV enthusiasts in the U.S.

Seeing the country in an RV offers many benefits for travelers seeking an affordable and exciting way to spend quality family time. According to one study, a family of four can save up to 74% traveling by RV over more conventional travel. And with more than 16,000 public and privately owned campgrounds in the US, there’s a site to fulfill everyone’s vacation fantasy, whether it’s an oceanfront view, hiking trails, casino gambling or tennis.

6 Tips for Successful RV Travel
RV travel is easy to learn, and once you’ve got the hang of it there’ll be no going back! Here are six helpful tips that will come in handy for both beginning and seasoned RV enthusiasts:

    1. Map Your RV Travel Destinations
      A large part of the RV appeal is the exhilarating freedom of the open road — to go wherever you want, whenever you want. But it helps to have a solid travel plan in place. If you know where you’re heading, you can determine the route that will offer the most interesting sights.Look in RV and other travel guides, contact tourism boards in states you’ll be passing through, and search the Internet.Make sure to bring the correct road maps, and a GPS system is a good idea as well, especially if you’re new to RV travel.

      Carefully designing the route you’ll be taking will make it easier to do spur-of-the moment things like checking out that oddball museum you just spotted on a roadside billboard!

    2. Have A Checklist? Just Checking
      During your pre-trip prep, in addition to working out what needs to be in the RV, put together a thorough checklist of things to do when setting up at an RV campground.There are the basics:

      • Locate all campground connections
      • Make sure your RV is level
      • Properly hook up your water, gas and electric systems

      Don’t forget comfort concerns, like making sure you packed your favorite CDs and DVDs, and those new lawn chairs.

      Equally important, you should have a second checklist of things that have to be done to break camp and set up your RV for departure (Quick hint: when you think the job is done and everything is ready, check again).

    3. Be Prepared with a “Just-For-The-RV” First-Aid Kit
      Always make sure you have a fully stocked RV first-aid kit, and keep it in an outside storage compartment.Your RV first-aid kit should include basic medical supplies:

      • Bandages
      • Ointment
      • Over-the-counter pain reliever
      • Insect repellant
      • Scissors
      • An emergency supply of must-have medications

      Plus the following extras for your RV:

      • Flashlight and extra batteries
      • Paper and pens
      • A disposable camera in case you have to take photos of an accident site.
      • Cell phone and charger

      If you don’t feel up to the task of putting together an RV first-aid kit yourself, an extensive range of ready-made first-aid kits is available for purchase.

      Don’t forget to include a list of important contact information, including family members, doctors, insurance agents, etc. [Editor’s note: Leave a copy of your itinerary and your contact information with a family member or friend, in case you need to be located in an emergency.]

       

    4. RV Camping with Kids and Pets
      If your RV travel includes children, make sure to set aside time during the day for outdoor activities, as even the roomiest RV can be confining for kids.And give each child his or her own space in the RV (no matter how small) for toys, games and personal stuff.RV travel is a unique opportunity for your children to see new and different places and faces. There are often plenty of other kids at campgrounds – but be sure to walk around a new campground with your children when you first get settled there. They need to know how to find your campsite and navigate the RV grounds. If you plan to bring the family pet, check beforehand to confirm that pets are allowed at the RV campground.
  1. A Little Help From Your Friends
    When in doubt, ask your fellow RVer. However well-traveled you might be, odds are there is someone you’ll meet along the way who has been somewhere you haven’t, solved a problem you haven’t yet encountered, or spotted an out-of-the-way delight you’ve never heard of.No matter how much research you’ve done, there’s bound to be an RV campsite you haven’t read about, a storage system that has escaped your notice, or a funny anecdote that you’ll laugh about for years to come.The new folks you meet may or may not become close friends for life, but they are an important part of your RV journey.
article written by John Noble from about.com

Fall camping in Pennsylvania is great!

Summer and the family camping season has come to a close. Don’t give up on the idea of a fall camping trip. Before putting away your camping gear until next summer, think about another camping trip. Those of us without kids are free to camp during the week, but families shouldn’t miss the opportunity to do some quality camping with their kids on weekends at local parks and campgrounds.

For those of you who are not blessed with children, it’s a good time to start planning a fall camping trip to one of those previously over-crowded, summer destination hot spots. After Labor Day, the visitor traffic to the State Parks, National Parks and National Forests slows down considerably, due primarily to the fact that kids are back in school.  Days aren’t as hot, and nights are just cool enough to cuddle under a blanket for a good sleep. And another blessing to fall campers is the fact that parks are less congested. Autumn colors can be magnificent, and wildlife could be active, offering opportunities to glimpse them as they prepare for winter.

The cooler nights are perfect for sitting around the campfire eating S’mores and banana boats and sharing stories and songs with your family, long time friends, and new acquaintances. When the leaves start changing colors the experience is even more worthwhile. So grab a sweatshirt, your tent, and head on out there to enjoy one of the most favorite seasons of the year!

Fall camping considerations

  • After Labor Day, many campgrounds reduce their fees, so one fall camping advantage is reduced costs.
  • Although daytime temperatures in the fall are still warm, take some heavier clothes and bedding for those cooler evenings.
  • As the seasons change, so to do the weather patterns. Be prepared for severe weather in the fall. If you are camping in hurricane alley, know your evacuation routes. If you are camping in high country, take appropriate snow gear. And, if you are in monsoon country, take necessary rain gear.
  • Make campground reservations. Popular campgrounds will still fill up on weekends, so it’s better to be safe than sorry. Most campgrounds don’t require reservations in the fall, but even if you should call and find that you don’t need a reservation, you’ve at least saved yourself the worry.

 

 

Today’s Campgrounds meet social media demands…

I recently came across this article that I found quite interesting. So I wanted to share it with you.  It amazes me how we have to stay connected, and be able to have that instantaneous update or check in with the rest of the world.  I am guilty of this myself. What about you?

Safe travels and Happy RVing!

Campgrounds embrace technology to meet big social media demand

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (AP) — For the Wohlfords of Noblesville, the Old Mill Run Park in Thorntown is a home away from home. The couple recently graduated from being weekend campers to full timers, staying there all summer long.

But with that upgrade came another —the need to have wireless Internet.

“We would be OK for a weekend,” said Mary Ann, 64. “But when you are full-time, for us, it wouldn’t work. There are just so many things that are (done) through the computer, through the Internet.”

Her husband, Steve Wohlford, agreed. “We need to stay in touch and pay our bills,” said Steve, 66.

NO DISCONNECT

It used to be that campers would take their RVs or tents and head into the woods to be rid of the electrical devices that distract and occupy our daily lives. However, as technology has become more mobile, it has become increasingly difficult to disconnect, even in the woods. Today, more campers request that campsites offer WiFi so they can stay connected and campground owners have accommodated this request.

About 72 percent of privately owned and operated campgrounds, RV parks and RV resorts offer wireless Internet service, according to a 2010 campground operations survey by the National Association of RV Parks and Campgrounds.

Eric Stumberg, founder and chief executive officer of TengoInternet, an Austin, Texas-based company that specializes in providing wireless Internet service to private campgrounds, said the trend started to take off about five years ago. Similar to hotels, campgrounds needed to offer WiFi as an amenity.

For his company, the number of unique connections has increased 50 percent to 75 percent each year, he said. This has been driven by more people connecting and families using multiple devices to do so.

“It’s weird, you would think if you were going camping you wouldn’t need to be connected,” he said. “(But) people want to be connected while they are traveling. Ten or 15 years ago, when people traveled, it wasn’t important that they stayed connected.”

Sandy and Ralph Christman own the RV Park where the Wohlfords are staying. They added WiFi about five years ago because campers were requesting it, Sandy said.

Pennsylvania RV cooking…

Let’s face it, not all of us have the patience to make enough home cooked meals to last an entire camping trip. While the road offers plenty of fast food or convenience store stops, nothing beats the taste of a freshly cooked meal. So we’re going to be sharing some of the easiest, tastiest, and most fun ways to cook while RVing and camping.

  • Hobo Pies

Hobo Pies are anything and everything, tossed in folded tinfoil bags, and cooked over a campfire until cooked.

  • Sausage, Ground Beef, or Chicken (or all three, it’s your pie!)
  • Veggies (Squash, Zucchini, Broccoli, Asparagus, etc.)
  • Peppers (Green, Red, Yellow, and Jalapenos)
  • Onion (White or Yellow)
  • Potatoes
  • Seasonings (Garlic Powder, Crushed Red Peppers, Seasoned Salt, etc.)
  • Sauces (BBQ, Worcestershire, Ranch)
  • Trash Breakfast
    A Trash Breakfast is the Hobo Pie of breakfast. Cooked in the same method, tinfoil bags, A Trash Breakfast is cooked on a grill or fire and turned every 5 minutes until done.

    • Shredded Hash Browns
    • Eggs (Beaten)
    • Ham or Sausage (Pre-cooked)
    • Veggies, Onions, or Peppers as desired
    • Shredded Cheese of your choice
    • Seasonings of your choice

And for those of you who opt to cook over your RV range top, try:

  • Meal in a Skillet
    Meal in a Skillet is just that, an entire meal in a skillet!

    • 1 or 2 pounds of ground beef (depending on the number of people)
    • 1 undrained can whole kernel corn
    • 1 undrained can white or ranch-style beans
    • 1 onion
    • 2 to 3 medium to large potatoes, sliced round (like chips!)
    • 1 can tomatoes
    • Salt and pepper
    • Optional: For those who’d like cornbread, 1 to 2 packages of cornbread mix

In a cast iron skillet, cook and season beef. Next, layer sliced potatoes, season. Continue layering and seasoning with corn, beans, and tomatoes. Cook until potatoes are fork-tender and serve! (If you decided to serve with cornbread, bake cornbread after layers are assembled. Serves 4-6.

Safe Travels and Happy RVing!

10 Best RV Parks in North America

 

The RV season is underway and for those that are just starting out, and even those who have been at it for years, finding the perfect destination can be challenging. For most people, the ultimate goal of a camping trip or vacation is to “get away” from the world and relax as a family. To help you find the perfect spot, we found a list of the “The 10 Best RV Parks in North America” as compiled by Rates to Go.

“The 10 Best RV Parks in North America”:

10. Madison Arm Resort, Montana

Located in West Yellowstone, Montana, Madison Arm Resort is a mere 8 miles outside of Yellowstone National Park, making it easily accessible for visitors who don’t wish to camp or stay within the park’s sometimes crowded borders. Be sure to stroll by Lake Hegben for fishing, swimming, and site seeing in between trips to the national park itself!

9. Squaw Flat Campground, Utah

Tucked in the Needles section of Canyonlands National Park in Moab, Utah you’ll find the incredible Squaw Flat Campground. The park is known for its beautiful stone pillars, rock formations, and Indian rock paintings. RV travelers will enjoy the scenic landscape as they drive along US 191 on their way into the park, while hikers will find the three-mile hike to Chesler Park an incredible experience.

8. Boyd’s Key West Campground, Florida

A trip to Florida does not automatically translate to a stuffy hotel stay. Key West gives visitors access to dozens of major attractions while Boyd’s Key West Campground provides saltwater fishing, a boat dock, and a fun Tiki Hut experience for every RVer staying in one of its waterfront campsites. Don’t forget to visit Duval Street for the sunset celebration in Mallory Square each evening!

7. Mt. Desert Narrows Camping Resort, Maine

Mt. Desert Narrows Camping Resort, found in Bar Harbor, Maine, is known as the only national park in New England. The Mt. Desert Narrows or Narrows Too sections provide excellent sites for those seeking an ocean view, while the Patten Pond area of the park gives visitors access to the 740-acre lake. Canoeing, hiking, biking, and whale watching are only a few of the activities available to visitors in Bar Harbor!

6. Horsethief Lake Campground, South Dakota

At the base of Mt. Rushmore you’ll find Black Hills National Forrest and the Horsethief Lake Campground. Fishing and horseback riding are popular daytime activities, while you may choose to start the evening with a view of the mountain from the lighting ceremony. Be sure to head on over to the Crazy Horse Memorial. Believe it or not, the memorial is larger than all four heads of the Mt. Rushmore carvings combined!

5. Rivers Edge RV Park, Alaska

Traveling to Alaska via a well-stocked RV might prove to be one of the most cost-effective ways to visit the lonely state. Rivers Edge RV Park is located in Fairbanks, Alaska and is full of historic sites such as gold mining towns and Indian Villages. It’s the perfect stop for visitors who find themselves on their way to the famous Alaska Highway!

4. Orchard (Huerta Saucedo) Vacation Village, Mexico

You don’t need to stay in an all-inclusive resort to experience the beauty and culture in Mexico. Mulege, Mexico is the home of the Orchard Vacation Village (also known as Huerta Saucedo). If you’re looking for something different you might try your hand at clamming, while those interested in history will enjoy cave tours or trips into Mulege to see the old penitentiary. If all else fails, you won’t regret time spent in the sun on the white sandy beaches!

3. Tunnel Mountain Campground, Canada

RV trips need not be limited to the summer months. Located in Banff National Park in Canada you’ll find Tunnel Mountain Campground. Enjoy breathtaking views of the Canadian Rockies in between ski or snowmobile trips. Those who prefer a little more control will enjoy hiking, biking, or visits to the nearest hot spring!

2. Yosemite Pines RV Park, California

In Groveland, California lies Yosemite Pines RV Park. Open year round, the park offers a variety of truly unique experiences. Hike, pan for gold, or take a chartered plain tour over the scenic park for a bird’s eye view of Gold Country! This campground is an excellent option for travelers who don’t want to stay within Yosemite Park itself.

1. Rocky Knob Campground, Virginia

Along the Blue Ridge Parkway, near mile marker 167, you’ll find Rocky Knob Campground. View some of the most incredible mountain ridges on the eastern coast of the United States while enjoying dozens of historic attractions. The mills, the craftsmen, and the music are only the beginning. Bring your dancing shoes for the Friday evening hoe-down and don’t forget to stop by Mabry Mill – one of the most popular attractions along the parkway itself!

If you haven’t had enough, check out Travel Channel’s article “RV Crazy: America’s Best RV Parks”.